Greek Mythology 7 The Olympian Gods

Greek Mythology 7 The Olympian Gods - The Olympian Gods...

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The Olympian Gods Continued -
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Leda Zeus transforms himself into a Swan and rapes Leda Wife of Tyndareus of Sparta
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Clytemnestra and Helen Castor and Polydeuces The Dioskouroi
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Ganymede Trojan princeling abducted and taken to Olympus Becomes the cupbearer of the Gods Significance of the
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Idealized youth Berlin painter Circa 480 BCE
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Ganymede and Tithonos Brothers Tithonos captured by Eos Titan associated with the Dawn Eos requests immortality from Zeus but forgets something The Boon with a Catch
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μάτι mati
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Hera Sister, Consort and Wife of Zeus Primarily a goddess of women and marriage Closely associated with the city of Argos and the island state of Samos
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Temple to Hera on Samos
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Dedications at Samos
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Jealousy of Hera Major animating factor in numerous myths concerns Hera’s jealous toward the various women seduced by her husband Most dramatically expressed toward Heracles Source of dramatic narrative force in many stories
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Zeus and his Children Why does the narrative of Zeus as the unfaithful husband repeat itself so often?
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2012 for the course CLASSICS 122 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '12 term at UMass (Amherst).

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Greek Mythology 7 The Olympian Gods - The Olympian Gods...

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