Lecture 14 Population genetics II

Lecture 14 Population genetics II - Biol142 Foundations in...

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Biol142 Foundations in Modern Biology II Cellular Biology and Genetics Lecture 14 – Friday, February 17 th , 2012 Population Genetics II. Reading: Klug, Emory 2 nd Ed. Chapter 23 (pages 483-488)
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Learning objectives At the end of this lecture, you will be able to: 1) Describe the conditions required for a population to meet Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. 2) Determine whether a population is operating under Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium.
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Last time: ! We examined the concepts of allele frequency and genotype frequency first by examining two different populations with identical allele frequencies, but different genotype frequencies. ! We next performed a “mass mating experiment” and determined that, under the conditions of this experiment, the proportions of dominant and recessive alleles (allele frequency) of the “A gene” in our classroom population were maintained from one generation to the next .
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Before we begin: ! Consider the conditions of our “mass mating experiment” at the end of yesterday’s class ! the conditions of our “matings” did not precisely reflect the reality of mating in a real population. ! List at least 3 conditions of our experiment that did not reflect reality. ! Under a specific set of conditions a population of sexually reproducing organisms can demonstrate Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium , that we will examine today. In this state, neither the allele nor the genotype frequencies change from generation to generation.
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The Hardy-Weinberg law describes what happens to alleles and genotypes in an “ideal” population. ! Our in-class “mass-mating” experiment approximated many of
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2012 for the course BIO 142 taught by Professor Escabar during the Spring '08 term at Emory.

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Lecture 14 Population genetics II - Biol142 Foundations in...

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