Lecture 3

Lecture 3 - Biol142 Foundations in Modern Biology II...

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Unformatted text preview: Biol142 Foundations in Modern Biology II Cellular Biology and Genetics Lecture 4 – Wednesday, January 25 th , 2012 Bacterial Genetics III: Transformation and Transduction Reading: Klug, Emory 2 nd Ed. Chapter 8 (pages 170-175) Learning objectives At the end of this lecture, you will be able to: 1) Explain the process of bacterial transformation. 2) Describe the structure and the lysogenic and lytic cycles of a bacteriophage virus. 3) Interpret the results of the Zinder and Lederberg U-tube experiment. 1. Genetic information is transferred from one bacterium to another by three processes: 1. Conjugation (lectures 2 & 3): involves the transfer of DNA from a donor cell to a recipient cell via a sex pilus. 2. Transformation (today): involves the transfer of genetic information by means of “naked” extracellular DNA in bacteria. 3. Transduction (today): involves the transfer of genetic information to a bacterium from a bacteriophage or between bacterial or yeast cells mediated by a phage vector. Bacterial cells can take up small pieces of extracellular DNA ! Entry of DNA is thought to occur at a limited number of receptor sites on the surface of a competent bacterial cell . ! A competent cell is able to take up extracellular ("naked") DNA from its environment (ie – expresses the receptor). • Genes adjacent to or very close to one another can be carried on a single transforming DNA . Consequently, a single transfer can result in the cotransformation of several genes simultaneously. Soon after entry, one of the two strands of the double helix is digested by nucleases, leaving only a single strand to participate in transformation....
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2012 for the course BIO 142 taught by Professor Escabar during the Spring '08 term at Emory.

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Lecture 3 - Biol142 Foundations in Modern Biology II...

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