Calorimetry - Calorimetry Experimentally, we can determine...

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Calorimetry Experimentally, we can determine the heat flow ( H rxn ) associated with a chemical reaction by measuring the temperature change it produces . The measurement of heat flow is called calorimetry An apparatus that measures heat flow is called a calorimeter Heat capacity and specific heat The temperature change experienced by an object when it absorbs a certain amount of energy is determined by its heat capacity . The heat capacity of an object is defined as the amount of heat energy required to raise its temperature by 1 K ( or °C ) The greater the heat capacity of an object, the more heat energy is required to raise the temperature of the object For pure substances the heat capacity is usually given for a specified amount of the substance The heat capacity of 1 mol of a substance is called its molar heat capacity The heat capacity of 1 gram of a substance is called its specific heat The specific heat of a substance can be determined experimentally by measuring the temperature change ( T ) that a known mass ( m ) of the substance undergoes when it gains or loses a specific quantity of heat ( q ): 209 J of energy are required to increase the temperature of 50.0 g of water by 1.00 K. What is the specific heat of water?
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2012 for the course CHM CHM1045 taught by Professor Hectorrodriguez during the Winter '11 term at Broward College.

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Calorimetry - Calorimetry Experimentally, we can determine...

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