EGR_102_Lab_01B_Excel_II-1

EGR_102_Lab_01B_Excel_II-1 - Microsoft Excel II EGR102 Lab...

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Microsoft Excel ® II EGR102 - Lab 01B 1
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Arithmetic Operations Calculation operators: + - * / ^ Ordered left to right using operator precedence May control using parenthesis to group operations =(3+6)/2 will yield 4.5 = 3 + 6/2 will yield 6 Exponentials using caret ^ =3^2 will yield 9 May refer to other cells within the worksheet If A2=5 & B2=4, then C2=A2*B2 will yield 20 C2 is known as a dependent cell EGR102 - Lab 01B 2
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Absolute vs Relative Addressing Absolute cell referencing is used to keep a cell reference constant; it uses “$” before row or column Ex: $B$20 is absolute & B20 is relative May mix references, i.e. B$20, where the column reference changes when you copy this cell to another because it is relative. The row reference does not change because it is absolute. EGR102 - Lab 01B 3
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Absolute vs Relative Addressing May use formulas with absolute cell references Ex: =A4*(1 + $C$3) Where: A4 is relative and $C$3 is absolute Most useful for columns or rows of data, where the same operation must be performed multiple times EGR102 - Lab 01B 4
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