lecture1_analyzing-1 - Analyzing Politics An Introduction...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Analyzing Politics: An Introduction Analyzing Politics: An Introduction PLS 100: Intro to American National Government Professor Lee Michigan State University
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Analyzing Politics: An Introduction What is politics? Recurring themes in politics Studying/analyzing politics What is politics? “Process through which individuals and groups reach agreement on a course of common (collective) action.” Social process that applies to many situations, outside of American national politics and politics in general. How do individuals interact and decide things?
Image of page 2
Analyzing Politics: An Introduction What is politics? What’s the problem? People see the world differently and have different preferences . Pizza or tacos? Universal health care or not? Higher or lower taxes? Problem: How can a group of individuals who may like different things agree on a decision? Fraternity, sorority Residents of the U.S. Members of the U.S. House
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Analyzing Politics: An Introduction Collective action problems Problems of Collective Action No one person determines the outcome. Just one person in the group. Different sorts of “collective action problems” in different contexts. 1 Coordination 2 Prisoner’s dilemma Free-rider problem Tragedy of the commons Institutions can help solve these problems. Set of rules that structure interactions between individuals.
Image of page 4
Analyzing Politics: An Introduction Collective action problems Coordination Coordination problems Everyone might agree on some goal, but achieving it takes the group to work together. Might be difficult to coordinate efforts of all individuals in the group. Example: Protests and rallies. Most effective if lots of people go to the same place at the same time. Someone to help people coordinate. Various rallies in D.C. in 2010: Glenn Beck (Restoring Honor rally); John Stewart and Stephen Colbert (Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear) Occupy Movements in 2011 – some help from social networking (Facebook, Twitter) to coordinate.
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Analyzing Politics: An Introduction Collective action problems Prisoner’s Dilemma Prisoner’s dilemma Steve and Wen-Chin are arrested for suspicion of robbing a bank.
Image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern