Group Work Paragraphs - Paragraph A During the spawning...

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Paragraph A During the spawning season, a female darter lays around six hundred eggs in the swift water of the gravel shoals in the shallowest parts of a river. The eggs, rolling along the bottom, have a sticky exterior, and will fasten onto a stone. There, for about two weeks, the embryos inside develop. Upon hatching, they drift downstream to a pool of deep water – if they are lucky, that is; infant mortality, as with most fish, is very high. Probably less than one or two percent of the eggs laid produce adults. All kinds of darters, including snail darters, probably eat snail- darter eggs and larvae. The deepwater pools act as snail-darter nurseries. For some weeks, the larvae live on the unconsumed egg yolk they carry with them. They are strange, still embryonic-looking things, less than a quarter of an inch long. After the egg yolk is gone, they stay in the pool, feeding on micro crustaceans through the summer. By fall, the diet shifts to snails, and the fish make their way back upstream to the shallows. Paragraph B The fight crowd is a beast that lurks in the darkness behind the fringe of white light shed over the first six rows by the incandescents atop the ring, and is not to be trusted with pop bottles or other hardware. The tennis crowd is the pansy of all the great sports mobs and is always preening and shushing itself. The golf crowd is the most unwieldy and most sympathetic, and is the only horde given to mass
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Group Work Paragraphs - Paragraph A During the spawning...

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