The Origin and Nature of Species

The Origin and Nature of Species -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Origin and Nature of Species  16:03 What is a species?  What could you measure?  Mating experiments  What is a species?  An evolutionary independent population or group of populations  How recognized? Many definition, emphasize different processes  One definition does not fit all species!  Biological Species Concept (BSC)  Potential to interbreed under natural conditions and produce viable, fertile offspring  Key emphasis: reproductive isolation  Gene flow= biological species a clear evolutionary “unit”  Lack of gene flow-> evolutionary independence  Most widely used (in sexual species)  BSC- limitations  Boundaries can be arbitrary  Ring species  Don’t always know who has the “potential” to interbreed?  Direct tests can be  Impractical- distant populations 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Impossible- fossils  Can’t apply to asexual organisms  E.g. is every asexual individual a distinct species?  Morphospecies concept  Key emphasis: distinguishing features  Assumed to indicate evolutionary independence  Widely applicable  Fine working model- incompletely studied groups, fossils  Limitation- subjective  Which features to use?  How different is enough?  Phylogenetic Species Concepts- PSC  Species are monophyletic groups of populations  Key emphasis: phylogentic history  Monophyletic group= clade  Figure 26.3  Limitations:  Few complete phylogenies available  Sometimes biological species are not monophyletic  All 3 species concepts used, in combination when possible  Summary: Table 26.2
Background image of page 2
Origin of Species  2types  Anagensis (phyletic evolution)  New species originates within a lineage, with splitting  Cladogenesis  New species originates through splitting of the lineage  Focus here  How do populations become species?  When gene flow is reduced, isolated populations can diverge by…  Natural selection, genetic drift, mutation  Figure 25.4  Without gene flow – divergence, and eventual speciation, is essentially inevitable!  In allopatry: populations are physically separated  “Different homeland”  In sympathy: populations are overlapping  Same homeland  Allopatric Speciation  Physical barrier divides population  Colonization of new location  E.g. dispersal to new island 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Founder effect, genetic drift in small population, new selection pressures-> rapid  divergence  Figure 26.5  Species range is split- vicariance  E.g. by new mountain, river, valley, glacier, ocean  Figure 26.5  E.g. Isthmus of Panama- 3.5 mya  Caribbean sea/Pacific Ocean divided  E.g. ratite birds- Gondwana break up Figure 26.6  Reproductive isolation in allopatry can be achieved in the lab 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 52

The Origin and Nature of Species -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online