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Syllabi - r.“ “ School of Management NYIT New YORK...

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Unformatted text preview: r.“ “' School of Management NYIT New YORK iNSTITUTE or TECHNOLOGY MASTER SYLLABUS BUSI435: BUSINESS POLICY AND STRATEGY CAPSTONE 1. Course Details Semester: Course Code: BUSI435 Course Name: Business Policy and Strategy Capstone Course Prerequisites: None Course Co-requisites: BUSI405 Credits Hours: Three (3) credit hours Classroom: Class Timing: . (45 class hours + 2 hours final exam period) Final Exam Period: 2. lnstructor Details Professor: Office Location: 1 Office Hours: l x Email: Course website: Phone (Office): 3. Catalog Course Description This capstone, senior-year course, integrates knowledge and skills in the various functional areas of business for corporate and business strategy development. Student teams will develop a corporate mission, goals and objectives, and implement business policy by managing a complete value chain for a company; deploying marketing, operational and financial strategies and policies in a simulated competitive environment so as to achieve sustainable growth and productivity. Case studies and a computer-based management game will be employed. Mitts gagged baa:th gfiawfige New Test: tnsfituta mi Technomggy? -: School- of; Management twmung-imslufimanagemem School of Management New YORK ENSTITUIE or TECHNOLOG‘: 4. Course Overview The course is designed to integrate the knowledge and competencies developed in the three functional areas of business studies (marketing, operations, and finance) within a strategic management framework. Accordingly, the emphasis will be placed on the analysis, design and implementation of corporate/business strategies. Student teams will: 0 Discuss and affect the strategic management practices of organizations in environments under risk; 0 Develop an understanding of business enterprises, and the entrepreneurial and strategic thinking that drives these enterprises in dynamic competitive regional, national and global economies and design an organizational strategy and policies to affect the chosen strategy; 0 Analyze organization situations utilizing their understanding of the variables and interdependencies that influence the effectiveness and efficiency of their companies, and evaluate their decisions through an interactive business game; and 0 Apply concrete practical skills by way of industry situational analysis. This course utilizes the results of the ETS Major Field test (administered to each student in BUSl405) as a component in the grading rubric. 5. Course-Level Learning Goals1 (A) lnvariant Learning Goals (In support of the BSBA Programmatic Learning Goal(s)): Upon the successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1. Analyze and evaluate overall corporate strategies (Alf; Alg; Alj; A3); 2. Delineate and analyze the threats/opportunities in the business environment (Alb; A3); 3. Utilize short and long term forecasting models for market demand, exchange rates, revenues and costs (Alc); 1 A note on School of Management Course-Level Learning Goals: Learning goals are partitioned into those that are in support of the programmatic learning goals (Invariant), specific to the localized region of delivery (Contextualized), and specific to the domain expertise of the instructor (Instructor-Specific). The former two categories are required for all courses. Invariant "Assurance of Learning Validations” are Specifically linked to the associated programmatic learning goal and objective, with course-level learning goals representing the programmatic goal as it applies to the context of the course. Learning goals that focus on knowledge acquisition (Bloom’s Taxonomy) are not specifically or necessarily included into the course-level learning goals, although it is assumed that knowledge acquisition of all relevant business core fundamentals is addressed within each course. Examinations in class are used to provide feedback concerning knowledge and comprehension for the purpose of ensuring that students who have not mastered these will not advance through the curriculum. Attainment of knowledge within each core area is assessed by way of standalone testing of each student as a required part of the instructional program prior to graduation (e.g. ETS). mitt gtefiei tree-mess seawater; New York institute oi Yachnulugy " Schodt of Management ~ www.mmdugmauagemem School of Management NEW YORK INSTITUTE or TECHNOLOGY 4. Pl_ap a symbiotic relationship between the organization and the uncontrollable environment (Alc; A3); 5. Develop a Strategic Business Plan with embedded business policies for a multi—market/multi—business company (Alf; Alh); 6. Solve problems that require an understanding of the interdependence between strategy and tactics in each of the functional areas of business (Ala; A1d;A1i;A3); 7. Make decisions in the fundamental areas of marketing, operations, and finance, in a group setting (Ald, Alk); 8. Evaluate short term performance and p_la_n corrective actions (Alf); 9. _Us_ethe determinants of revenue growth, market share, earnings, brand image, and credit ratings (Aid); ' 10. Perform "what-if” analysis using a business simulation model (Aid); and 11. Develop and pl_ap for the implementation of corporate/business strategy using various theoretical approaches and models. (A4) \Assurance of Learning Validations (In support of the BSBA Programmatic Learning Goalls))2: A1. Global Industry Simulation: A Global Industry Simulation entitled GLO-BUSO: Developing Winning Competitive Strategies ( www.glo-bus.com) provides a framework for class discussions of strategic management processes and analysis techniques, in addition to guiding the devel0pment of materials that will assist in measuring the attainment of student learning outcomes. This Simulation is a dynamic computer—based, business exercise designed for practicing managers and students enrolled in a course that features decision-making at the strategic management level. It provides players with simulated real—world experience in managing the variables that are encountered in strategic choices. it enables the players to practice various principles in addition to learning them. Company (e.g. student team) co- managers must make decisions relating to R&D, component usage, camera performance, product line breadth, production operations, work force compensation, outsourcing, pricing, sales and marketing, and finance. 2 A note on School of Management Assurance of Learning Scoring: Scores form the metric for the degree to which the validation (e.g. learning outcome) satisfies the associated learning goal or objective. Assurance of learning validation descriptions identify the criteria for each score that is to be given. All scores are scaled from 1-5 (1—poor, 2-fair, 3—good, 4- very good, 5—excellent). It must be noted that scores are to be differentiated from grades. Scores form a criterion from which an instructor will ascertain an overall grade for any instrument of assessment, and the overall assessment the student receives for an instrument is a "grade." A score is an extraction that specifically measures the degree of attainment of a learning goal and/or objective. .t .33 gipisaf beaieess efiaaettea New ‘furk institute of technetium 1' Schwlf of: Mamagemefit * mnfiteduimanagamem School of Management a. NYIT YORK ixsru‘me or TECHNOLOGY [Week 1] Teams will be formed to function as decision-makers of various firms within an industry. Each team should consist of students from different majors to facilitate "cross-fertilization” and synergistic decision making. Team members will develop and submit a name for their company, an organizational chart, and job descriptions. Each team will justify their choices. Two scores are given: The criteria for the first score is the depth of analysis of the company name associated with branding (M201); the criteria for the second score is the team’s ability to create meaningful and comprehensive roles and responsibilities for each co-manager (6103); [Week 2]Teams must each conduct a study on the technical aSpects, characteristics and attributes of digital cameras and the technological trends in manufacturing and product innovation. Teams submit a summary that includes technical aspects and characteristics, associated consumer benefits, and emerging trends in the industry. Two scores are given. The criterion for the first score is the quality of the research and resulting structural variables (M301). The criterion for the second score is the identification of a consensus concerning technological developments and directions (M302). [Week 4] Each team will evaluate their company’s position in various international markets (Europe, Asia, Middle East, North America, etc.) The initial market position will vary across the international markets, in terms of market share (leader in some, follower in others). Since the game closely resembles reality, each team will submit a report (3- 5 pages) that includes: > A market potential study from business sources, for each of the international and domestic markets. A score will be given based on identification of the proper determinants of the market potential (M201); > A study on employees’ attitudes and motivations to assist in establishing a proper mix of training, performance incentives, and base salary. A score will is given based on the ability to ascertain culture-specific motivational structures (6202); and > A study of consumer perceptions and attitudes in different cultures toward product attributes, quality and price. A score will be given and based on the ability to identify culture—specific differences (6202). [Week 5] Members of a team (co-managers) will make decisions individually, and then _ communicate using the Instant Messenger of 6LO-BUSQ. Final decisions for each period should be a result of a (virtual and regular) group meeting, when each functional manager will present and justify his/her decision, as well as adjust them as a result of input from other co-managers. The faculty member is to attend one meeting per group (over the term). Two scores are given at this meeting. The first score will be given to each member on their ability to orally communication concepts clearly, the persuasiveness of their arguments, and the comprehension behind their mitt giebat besieeee efieeettw New ifork Ragtime of Technaiagnr ‘ School: of: Management - www.myitadnfmanagemwt School of Management NYIT NEW YORK {NSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY recommendations (6102). The second score is based on the group’s ability to be collegial and simultaneously effective (0103). Each team will have to make the following set of decisions for each time period: Design and performance of the camera line (10 decisions); Production operations and worker compensation (15 decisions); Pricing and marketing (16 decisions); Financing of company operations (4 decisions); and Social responsibility and citizenship (up to 6 decisions). Decisions must be submitted, by each group member in turn, prior to the deadline for a given period, at which time the computer will run the simulation and provide each team with the marketing, operating, and financial results on the company, and less detailed, on the competition. The first two periods will be considered as trials. VVVVV e. [Week 5] Before submitting the first "real" decisions, each team member will take an 0n-line assessment (quiz#1) on the knowledge of GL0—BUSo operations. This score is retained (M203). f. [Week 6] Each team, prior to submitting the first “real” decision, will submit a "Business Strategy” document (PowerPoint Slides), consisting of: > The Global Vision and Mission of the Company; > The Goals and Objectives (Strategic and Tactical) for each market segment; > The Marketing Strategy for each targeted market segment; and > Corporate Financial and Operating Strategy. Two scores are given for the "Business Strategy.” The first is based on the quality of the slides and ability to use PowerPoint (M204). The second is based on the alignment of the concepts discussed ' in class with the four aforementioned components (M401). Results of each period are presented by a set of reports: Overall Score (Per period and Game-to-date) based on company’s competitive standing, and on meeting the Shareholders’ expectations on Earnings—per-Share, Share Price, Image Rating, and Credit Rating, and an overview of the Industry’s performance and selected: Market share by product line-by market; Financial and Operating Statistics; Foreign Exchange Adjustments; Balance Sheets Data; VVVV gmat baaitiesa afieeafim New furl: linsfa’zute at Technology - Sfcl‘worl‘ of Management « wwwmhduilmmagement School of Management MIT NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY > Credit Ratings; and > Dividends paid. ‘ Pay special attention to the problem areas in marketing, operations, and/or finance highlighted in yellow. Develop hypothesis as to the possible cause(s) and integrated solution to the problem. Student teams are to perform "what—if” analysis, using Excel based simulation, for the problem solution. g. [Week 7] After the 3rd period, students adjust their initial strategic plan or business policy. Regardless of the degree of adjustment, each company will submit the "new" strategic plan (Power Point slides) and a written addendum specifying the changes. In that addendum students must indicate the areas of concern, as identified by the simulation and the subsequent what-if analyses, and a resulting solution that the team implemented. Two scores are given. The first is based on the quality of strategic thinking (M401), the second is based on the ability to derive a solution to the‘ tactical area of concern within the framework of the strategy (M102). h. [Week 10] All students take a second computer based assessment (quiz#2), testing the understanding of Key Strategic Factors, the underlying drivers and relationships (M402). i. [Week 14] Each team will prepare a Strategic Audit, evaluating the quality of a company’s strategic plans and implementation, using graphic tools, strategic group maps, all inserted in an MSWord document and PPT Slide presentation. The audit should discuss how preliminary strategy and policies were modified and the rationale behind these changes. Three scores are given. The first is based on the written quality of the overall effectiveness of the report in clearly conveying the embedded concepts (M204). The second grade is based on the team ability to comprehend the interrelationship between the functional areas and the linkage of these to the outcomes generated (M402). The third score is the ability of the team to communicate concepts effectively during the oral presentation (6102). j. [Week 15] Upon completion of the simulation, each team member will independently complete the peer evaluation exercise (6103). k. [Final Exam week]The final simulation scores are reported in support of the student team’s overall ability to strategize and effectively navigate the business landscape in a competitive environment (M402). A2. Weekly Reflective Reports (WRR): During the course, there will be ample opportunities for finding relevance of the course material to the localized events in the business world, things you observe and/or read about in the business press. WRR are short (1 to 3 typewritten pages) descriptions of such happenings and an interpretation/position, using the-vernacular developed in the course. Two scores Mia giahei mattress afiuaatiaa New Writ institute oi Technology -' Schaal. at Management 0 wwwnyiteduimanagemem School of Management A3. A4. NYIT NEW YGRK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY are given. The first is based on the quality of the writing (6101) and the second on the number of relevant localized concepts that were discussed in the analysis and the interpretation/position (6202). Scores achieved are added to examination scores. Each submission results in an addition to the midterm (or final) grade according to the following: Written Case Studies: [Weeks 6, 11] Each team of 3 to 4 students will be assigned 2 cases from the book. Each team must prepare a written report for each case including an analysis and the rationale behind conclusions or recommendations. Teams are expected to use any necessary software (such as Excel) in their analysis. The group grade for the written case study is based on three group scores. The criterion for the first group score (6 101) is the student team’s ability to articulate clearly the key issues of the case and their solutions. The criterion for the second score (M202) is the appropriate choice and use of technology software, either that found in the text or Excel-based, and the team ability to implement that software correctly in solving the case. The criterion for the third score (M102) is the team’s ability to extrapolate from the case future implications to strategy and organizational policy. Business Press Reading: [Week 14] Each student will read The Knowing-Doing Gap: How Smart Companies Turn Knowledge into Action and submit a 10 page paper at the end of the semester. The paper should identify three key obstacles to action, and identify a sample industry, multinational organization, or organizational unit whose performance may be compromised by way of the chosen obstacle. Sources must be cited from the business press and current news and events to support student choices, and innovative strategies to remediate potential roadblocks to strategy implementation should be recommended. Two scores are given on the paper. The criterion of the first score is the student’s ability to identify industry examples that apply to the identified strategic challenges and support their choices with citations (M301); the criterion for the second score is the degree of innovation and appropriateness of the remediation plan for the chosen examples (M302). gtpfiai wetness atteeattett New York. Enstimte of Technuing‘i * School at Martagement ‘ www.myicedujmanagemem School of Management NYIT NEW YORK INSTETUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (B) Contextualized (Localized) Learning Goal(s): Upon the successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1. Discuss current businesses strategies in United Arab Emirates. Students will present their findings and analysis in support of a conclusion that is drawn from or supported by data or literature. Assurance of Learning Validation (In support of the Contextualized (Localized) Learning Goal(s)): Bl. Written Team Project: Student teams must choose a localized (e.g. Abu Dhabi) business or public topic and: a. Collect the literature regarding the organizational mission, goals and objectives, and strategic emphases; ' b. Analyze the organization external environment and industry; and c. Clearly identify competitors, the organization’s distinctive advantage, and threats facing the organization, and innovative strategies to advance the organization’s mission. One score is given based on the ability to correctly assess these factors in the Abu Dhabi business environment (G301). (C) Instructor Specific Learning Goal(s) (Optional): None Assurance of Learning Validation (in support of the Instructor Specific Learning Goal(s)): None 6. Teaching and Learning Methodology This course employs instructor led lectures, student discussion and teamwork, case study, and a computer- based simulation to integrate all core business functions with an outcome of creating, implementing, evaluating and improving business strategy and policy. Emphasis is placed on_peer-learning and individual reflection. 7. Textbook Thompson, A., Strickland, A., and Gamble J. (2007). Crafting and Executing Strategy: The Quest for Competitive Advantage: Concepts and Cases. 16th Edition. McGraw-Hill Publishing. ISBN 13: 9780073381244. Online Learning Center www.mhhe.com[thomgson The student sections of this site contains: gtahai business; attenuates:- New York Enstifma of Technology s School; of Management v wwwngiteduimanagement School of Managemen...
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