Neurobiology III - As most things in Neuroscience, it all...

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As most things in Neuroscience, it all begins with Santiago Ramon y Cajal QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. 1852-1934 Nobel Prize 1906 QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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But Cajal could not have done it without Camilo Golgi’s staining method QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. 1852-1934 Nobel Prize 1906 QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decom are needed to see this pictu 1843-1926 Nobel Prize 1906
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Otto Loewi discovered neurotransmission QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decom are needed to see this pictu (1873-1961) Nobel 1936
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Basal lamina The neuromuscular junction is the synapse made between a motor neuron and a muscle fiber and is a very large synapse. The synaptic region on the muscle fiber has a special name, the END-PLATE QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decom are needed to see this pictu Bernard Katz (1911-2003) Nobel 1970
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From Wes Thompson
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Stimulation of the nerve always excites skeletal muscle fibers. It generates a synaptic potential that is so large, that it always exceeds threshold and generates an AP in the muscle fiber The synaptic potential at the neuromuscular junction is called an end-plate potential (EPP).
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Katz discovered miniature end-plate potentials QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Spontaneous “miniature” end plate potentials (mepp) Stimulate nerve Trial 1 Trial 2 Etc.
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Evoked endplate potentials from muscle bathed in very low Ca++ solution No stimulation: Record spontaneous Miniature endplate potentials (MEPPS)
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Distribution of sizes of evoked endplate potentials from muscle bathed in very low Ca++ Distribution of sizes of miniature endplate potentials (MEPPS) recorded from muscle fiber when nerve was not stimulated Poisson distribution : independent events, low frequency of occurrence.
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QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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Synapse-specific variation in amount of transmitter release Hundreds of vesicles are released at the NMJ in order that the postsynaptic cell (the muscle) reaches threshold for an action potential. One or a few synaptic vesicles are released at
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This note was uploaded on 03/28/2012 for the course BIO 49593 taught by Professor Wanser during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Neurobiology III - As most things in Neuroscience, it all...

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