357.5-Exhibits-Ch07

357.5-Exhibits-Ch07 - Exhibit 1 Importance of Appraisals...

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Unformatted text preview: Exhibit 1 Importance of Appraisals ������ �� ����������� ������ ����� ���� ��������� �� ������� ����� ����� ����� ����� �������� ��������� ����� ����� ����� ����� �� ������� ���� ���� ����� ���� �� ������ ���������� ���� ���� ���� ���� ��� ��� ���� ��� ���� ���� ���� ���� �� ���������� �� ������� ����������� ����� ���������� Source: Robert H. Woods, Michael P. Sciarini, and Jack D. Ninemeier, “The Use of Performance Appraisals in Three Segments of the Hospitality Industry: A Comparative Study,” Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education 10, no. 3 (1998): 59–63. Exhibit 2 Uses of Performance Appraisals ��� ������� ����������� ������������ ��������� ����� ����� ����� �������� ���������� ����� ����� ����� ��������� �������� ����� ����� ����� ����� ���������� ����� ����� ����� ����� Source: Robert H. Woods, Michael P. Sciarini, and Jack D. Ninemeier, “The Use of Performance Appraisals in Three Segments of the Hospitality Industry: A Comparative Study,” Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education 10, no. 3 (1998): 59–63. Exhibit 3 Rating Errors and Manipulative Rating Behavior Inflated Ratings Positive Deflated Ratings • Keep the employee motivated • Maximize the merit pay increase • Avoid creating damaging permanent records • Reward good recent performance • Assist an employee with personal problem • Reward effort • Like the employee personally • Scare better performance out of employee to prevent eventual termination • Build a stronger case against the employee who is destined to be terminated • Avoid hanging out dirty laundry • Make themselves look good • Avoid conflict or confrontation with employee • Promote a problem employee up and out of manager’s department • • • • Rater’s Motive Deviant Punish an employee Encourage an employee to quit Minimize merit pay increase Comply with organizational edict to keep ratings low Source: Clinton Longnecker and Dean Ludwig, “Ethical Dilemmas in Performance Appraisal Revisited,” Journal of Business Ethics 9 (December 1990): 966. Exhibit 4 Types of Appraisal Systems Used ���� ������� ������ ����� ������� ����������� ����� ��� ���������� ��� ����� ����� ��� ���������� �� ���������� ����� ��� ��� ����� ����� ��������� ����� ��� ����� ����� ����� ������������ �������� ������ ������ ������ ��� ����� ���� �� ���������� �������� � ����� ���� �� ����� �� ���� ���� ����� Source: Robert H. Woods, Michael P. Sciarini, and Jack D. Ninemeier, “The Use of Performance Appraisals in Three Segments of the Hospitality Industry: A Comparative Study,” Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education 10, no. 3 (1998): 62. Exhibit 5 Example of Paired Comparisons Ranking Employees to be ranked: Macaulay, Simpson, Taylor, Nathan Macaulay is better than Simpson Simpson is better than Taylor Nathan is better than Simpson Macaulay is better than Taylor Macaulay is better than Nathan Nathan is better than Taylor Macaulay is ranked #1 Nathan is ranked #2 Simpson is ranked #3 Taylor is ranked #4 ������� � ������ ������������ ����� ������� � ������� �� � ������� ������ ����� Quality of skills performance 1 2 3 4 5 Exceptional Average Poor Above average Below average Quality of behavioral performance 1 2 3 4 5 Exceptional Average Poor Above average Below average Attendance 1 2 3 4 5 Exceptional Average Poor Above average Below average Ability to work with others 1 2 3 4 5 Exceptional Average Poor Above average Below average Exhibit 8 Example of a Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale Rating Communicates effectively with staff members and attends meetings frequently Scale 7.00 6.00 5.00 Communicates satisfactorily with staff members and attends some meetings 4.00 3.00 Experiences difficulty communicating with staff members and attends meetings infrequently. 2.00 1.00 Sample Actions This manager calls a meeting to explain why the hotel will be cutting back on staff. Employees are permitted to ask questions and discuss why certain positions in the hotel are being eliminated. During a busy expansion program, this manager increases the frequency of policy-committee meetings to improve communication about and coordination of the project. About once a week this manager invites several line employees into his or her office for an informal talk about hotel activities. This manager neglects to discuss with his front-office manager the problem of overstaffing among the bell staff during certain periods of the day, but expresses concern to the resident manager. This manager misses department meetings and fails to visit with subordinates individually, but leaves memos around the hotel with instructions on what should be done. During executive-committee meetings this manager dismisses subordinates’ comments as stupid. Source: Robert H. Woods, Michael P. Sciarini, and Deborah Breiter, “Performance Appraisals in Hotels,” Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Administration Quarterly (April 1998): 25–29. ������� � ������� �� � ���������� ����������� ����� ����� Consistently friendly with guests 1. 1 2 3 almost never 4 5 almost always Consistently helps other servers 2. 1 2 3 almost never 4 5 almost always Consistently sells extras 3. 1 2 3 almost never 4 5 almost always Consistently easy to work with 4. 1 2 almost never 3 4 5 almost always Exhibit 10 Steps in Establishing an MBO Program 1. Employee proposes goals for upcoming evaluation period. 2. Employee and manager discuss goals, modify as necessary, and reach an agreement on specific goals—which are established and agreed to in writing. 3. Employee and manager agree on specific action plan to attain goals. 4. Manager encourages goal attainment informally during evaluation period. 5. At the end of the period, employee and manager meet again to discuss accomplishments and agree on extent to which goals were attained. 6. Process is repeated. Exhibit 11 Sample MBO Appraisal Form Hotel Name of Manager Review Period Reviewer Performance goals Measures of results Results (1) Market share Room-nights Increase by 3 percent (2) Guest service guest comments Ratio of positive to 94 percent Increase from 90 (3) Room-department profit Room-department income percentage Increase by 1 percent (4) Employee morale Grievance rate Decrease by 5 percent (5) Employee development training completions Number of completions Increase by 10 percent (6) Health and safety conditions Number of accidents Decrease by 10 percent (7) Hotel external relations Number of leadership positions No change Source: Robert H. Woods, Michael P. Sciarini, and Deborah Breiter, “Performance Appraisals in Hotels,” Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Administration Quarterly (April 1998): 25–29. Exhibit 12 Frequency of Hospitality Performance Appraisals Frequency Lodging Clubs Restaurants All Industries Quarterly 5.6% 1.1% 11.7% 3.6% Semi-annually 18.2% 16.5% 27.3% 15.6% Annually 67.1% 80.1% 41.6% 62.9% Other 9.1% 2.3% 19.5% 18.0% Source: Robert h. Woods, Michael P. Sciarini, and Jack D. Ninemeier, “The use of Performance Appraisals in Three Segments of the hospitality Industry: A Comparative Study,” Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education 10, no. 3 (1998): 61. ...
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2012 for the course HRAD 3784 taught by Professor Murathancer during the Spring '12 term at Oklahoma State.

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