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Hatecrimeresearch-1 - HATE CRIME SUPPORTING CALIFORNIAS...

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HATE CRIME: SUPPORTING CALIFORNIA’S HATE CRIME LAWS Supporting California’s Hate Crime Laws Jessica Blocker COM/156 15 January 2012 Pamela Talley 1
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2 The Federal Bureau of Investigation (1992) defines a hate crime as a criminal offense perpetrated against property or a person, which is motivated by the perpetrators biased against the victims religion, race, sexual orientation, ethnicity or national origin, or disability. In addition to the direct impact on its victims, hate crimes have pervasive secondary and tertiary effects on the victims [perceived] group. For instance, in Jasper, Texas on June 7, 1998 James Byrd Jr., nearly fifty-year-old African American man, was dragged approximately two kilometers along a dirt road. His body was dragged until it torn apart by accused perpetrator John King, twenty-four-year-old White supremacist man, and two others.. The random brutality of James Byrd’s seemed to give a sense of responsibility and strike fear in numerous African American leaders, some of whom articulated any member of the African American community could have been analogously violated. The day of Byrd’s funeral around 15 African American men in uniforms and armed marched into Byrd’s neighborhood, advocating fellow African Americans to take up arms. America’s past of justifying, condoning, or ignoring crimes against [perceived] minority groups has left members of said groups questioning America’s view of value on their lives. In an act of psychological turnaround, violence is normalized if it is aimed at groups considered as existing ‘outside’ or ‘other’ to majority norms of society . For example, in 1939 John King’s uncle, Lawrence King, was tried for killing a gay man who had allegedly made sexual advances on Lawrence. Lawrence’s lawyers made a case of that the defendant’s actions “justified in repulsing ‘unnatural advances’” . Cases like Lawrence King’s show in history where hate crime against a gay or lesbian depict majorities norm attitude that gays or lesbians had it coming for their [perceived] immoral sexuality. Whereas violence usually is deemed as
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HATE CRIME: SUPPORTING CALIFORNIA’S HATE CRIME LAWS an intolerable crime, but the same perception is undercut of violence toward member of [perceived] minority group involving bias, hatred, or prejudice. Combining the ‘outside’ feeling a person has and history’s documentation hatred, it is simple to see why hate crimes not only impact the victim but also the correlating [perceived] minority group. At the same time theoretically, a hate crime is an extreme sense of aversion, with hate regard as so firmly ingrained it produces a hostile attitude—usually present the perpetrator’s whole life—to someone deemed as an enemy. For this reason this idea of such firmly ingrained anger or resentment being the conception of enmity. The perfect example of such enmity is hate groups. From 2002 to 2008 organizations like groups of neo-Confederate, black separatist, white nationalist, Ku Klux Klan, and neo-Nazi increased 25 percent per capita .
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