Jazz and Segregation

Jazz and Segregation - Jazz and Segregation Segregation and...

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Unformatted text preview: Jazz and Segregation Segregation and the general ill-treatment of blacks was prominent until the 1960s. This phenomenon though very cruel, led to one of the most unifying actions of the African- American race through music. This led to a release and the ultimate form of expression for an entire race and an expansion of narrow-minded thinking by some who were stereotypically in opposition. From the Jim Crow Laws, World War I, to the Roaring Twenties, jazz has undergone several miraculous changes. What is now known as the superior and complex art of Jazz has evolved into this form after vanquishing many barriers, while being the stimulant of African-American spirits for years. This arts progression began with the Jim Crow laws creating a solid segregation line. Due to segregation, the creoles and blacks had to integrate merging their two intricate and very different cultures and traditions. Hence the birth of Jazz. Jazz was formed on unison of these two groups combining their usually colliding sounds. The creoles brought their European parlor influences, while the blacks brought their colliding sounds....
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Jazz and Segregation - Jazz and Segregation Segregation and...

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