PHI MOD 5 READING

PHI MOD 5 READING - 2/24/12 PHI-105 21st Century Skills:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 2/24/12 PHI-105 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 27-Feb-2012 (PEO101) PH 105 Objectives 0 Explain how individuals acquire and develop language. 0 Determine the role of language in the development ofcritical 0 Develop a preliminary persuasive essay. Thinking and Language LECTURE Five READINGS 0 Read chapter 5 in the textbook. Module Purpose This module introduces you to language and its relation to the thinking process. From the text and other readings, as well as the other supplemental resources, you will be able to learn about the most essential tool we have in connecting our ideas to our actionsa€”language. This module includes concepts such as what language is and why we create it; how language is used to express our thoughts, or is it how we use our thoughts to express our language; and the sensual organizing elements of language. Module Concept #1: What is human language? Why do humans have language? Birds chirp, dogs bark, and bees buzz. So what is the big deal about humans and our use of languages? Although it is true that other animals have language, as you read, watch, and discuss the information in this module, you will see why it is said that hurmns seem to be the only ones that have language about language. You may be able to commimicate with your pet, but you and Rover will never leave each other notes about not sleeping on the coach Rover has never been able to write or read books, compose a concerto, or set up institutions, like colleges, to continue iiom where others have ended. Not unlike computer technology, for which we humans have created yet other languages, language is said to be the "software" of our brain. Language gives your thoughts meaning, structure, and context. Your software (language) works with your processor (brain) to keep your entire system fimctioning efiecfively. Natural languages are prolific; as of 2009, there existed over 6,900 natural languages in the world. Chances are that you know more than one language. You are reading a form of English, one of the thousands of natural angel03.gcu.edu/section/defauIt.asp?id=1263520 1/4 2/24/12 PHI-105 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 27-Feb-2012 (PEO101) languages. You rmy also know the constructed languages of math, music, sign, or computer science. Language is also universal, constructive, and dynamic. Just like the hurmns from which they come, languages live, change, and die, all in an efi'ort to bring us together to share our thoughts and form stronger relationships. Moving from our thoughts to sounds to words to sentences, language shapes us as a person and allows us to come together as humanity. The following readings and videos are optional and are not required for the assignments. 0 Read "Does Your Language Shape How You Think?" by Deuthscher, located on The New York Times Web site at ht_th/www.nm s.com/2010/08/29/magaAn' e/29langgge-thtml 0 Explore the Etlmologue: languages of the World Web site at hflpflwwwethnologficom/ 0 View "Jane Goodall on What Separates Us From the Apes," located on the TED Web site at 'f/www.ted.com/talks e 'ane_ ooda11_on_what_se arates_us_fiom_the_a es.html 0 Read "What's in a Word?," located on the Newsweek Web site at impJ/wwwnewsweek.com/2009/07/08/what— s—in-a-word.html 0 View "Lera Boroditsky: How Language Shapes Thought," located at hitp J/fora.tv/2010/1 0/26/Lera_Boroditsky_How_[@glagLShapeLThought 0 Read "Language May Shape Human Though "by Biever, located on the NewScientist Web site at h 'J/wwwnewscientist.com/article/dn6303-la -ma -sha e—human—tho t.html 0 Listen to "Animal Thought and Communication," located on the NPR Web site at J/www. r.or te lates/sto /sto . ?sto Id=1601349 Module Concept #2: What Comes First, Thought or Language? Some argue that it may be the classic chicken or the egg dilenmaa€”which came first, thought or language? But there is no debate about the hot that thinking and language support, cultivate, and enrich each other. And why not? They are both of the same mind. Sit back and think. How do you bring meaning to your thoughts? If you know more than one language, in which one do you think? Why? If you thought better, do you think you could speak, read, or write better? Which would come first? The following readings and videos are optional and are not required for the assignments. 0 View "James Geary, Metaphorically Speaking," located on the TED Web site at J/www.ted.com/talks/la e 'ames _meta horica _s eak' .html 0 Read "Which Comes First, Language or Thought?" by Cromie, located on the Harvard University Gazette angel03.gcu.edu/section/defauIt.asp?id=1263520 2/4 2/24/12 PHI-105 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 27-Feb-2012 (PEO101) Web site at hfip://news.harvard.edu/ga§tte/2004/07.22/21-think.html 0 View "Steven Pinker on Language and Thought," located at '//www.da tioncom/video/x3 0vo4_steven— inker-on—la e— and-tho 60 1e Module Concept #3: The Sensual Elements of Language For the purposes of the charts below, the following terms are defined as follows: 0 Orak uttered by the mouth 0 Verbal: pertaining to words filial;i Non-verbal Monaural! Men-verbal Examples: screams, grunts. cries Examples: gestures, facial expressiens i'Jralii 1|iierlaal Nen-erali’ Verbal Examples: speaking Examples: written language When organized through the senses, language is often grouped into two modes of expression: oral or auditory, and non-oral or visual forms. You can see that language is driven primarily by two senses, hearing and seeing. Imagine the accommodations and extra eifort you would have to make in using a languagea€”expressing your thoughtsa€”if either of these senses was impaired. Both the auditory and visual dimensions are typically fiirther divided into two sub-sections. The two oral/auditory sectors are sound (nonverbal but still oral), and verbal Oral-nonverbal expressions may be screams, grunts, groans, and cries. Think of a baby trying to tell you he or she is hungry or wet. Then envision if everyone in the world were limited to oral-nonverbal interaction. One advantage of this type of communication, however, is that it can occur through any of the five senses. Speaking styles, tone, and stress also add to oral-nonverbal language impact. The other auditory section, verbal, is the wonderfill ability to speak and listen, to communicate using the languages you have learned. The two visual sectors are the physical, or non— oral/nonverbal, and the symbolic. The non-oral/nonverbal forms of expressions are commonly (yet too simply) referred to as nonverbal commlmication, such as gestures, facial expressions, eye contact, etc. From dance, to fashion, to architecture, we use numerous forms of non- oral/nonverbal communication to articulate our ideas. However, as described above, it is not merely the aspect of being defined as nonverbal that makes communication so uniquely human Birds chirp, dogs bark, and bees buzz. Arguably, the most hurmn aspect of angel03.gcu.edu/section/defauIt.asp?id=1263520 3/4 2/24/12 PHI-105 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 27-Feb-2012 (PEO101) language is non-oral, but verbal, the creation of symbolsa€”language about languagea€”letting one thing (word) represent something else (person, place, event, thing, etc.). It is when we form symbols and agreements about those symbols that we give and express meaning to our thoughts. Module Concept #4: Thought, Language, and Your Persuasive Essay Think about the ways you are expressing your thoughts in your persuasive essay€1€”how you are using language. How are you expressing your thoughts on the topic you picked? Why are you using the words you are using? What about your tone? What tools are you bringing into play to help you with your language development? REFERENCES Lewis, M. Paul (Ed.). (2009). Ethnologue: Languages of the world (16th ed.). Dallas, TX: SIL International Retrieved April 12, 201 1, float http 'f/www.etlmologue.com/etimo_docs/distributionasp?by=area VERSION: 1.5 angel03.gcu.edu/section/defauIt.asp?id=1263520 4/4 ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/01/2012 for the course PHI 105 taught by Professor Larson during the Spring '12 term at Grand Canyon.

Page1 / 4

PHI MOD 5 READING - 2/24/12 PHI-105 21st Century Skills:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online