{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

PPPodcast12 - PPPodcast Week 12 Welcome to the PPPodcast...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PPPodcast: Week 12 Welcome to the PPPodcast for Week 12. This week’s Major Concept is VIRUSES. Just what are viruses, and how do they differ from other plant pathogens? First of all, you’ll be glad to hear that when you learn about plant viruses there are no scientific names to memorize! Plant viruses are often named for the plant that they infect and a symptom or two that they induce. Tobacco mosaic virus , for example, infects tobacco plants and causes a mosaic pattern of dark and light green areas on the leaves. On the negative side, this virus also infects other plant species, sometimes causing different types of symptoms, which can be confusing. But on the positive side, there is a simple relationship between the pathogen name and the disease name for viral pathogens - just drop the word “virus”. Thus, the viral pathogen Tobacco mosaic virus causes the disease tobacco mosaic. Viruses are the smallest pathogens that we study in Plant Pathology 200. While fungi and nematodes are multicellular and bacteria are single celled organisms, viruses are sub cellular - smaller than a single cell. Individual virus particles, which are also called virions , cannot be seen with the naked eye and are not even visible with the aid of a light microscope. A powerful microscope that uses electrons to visualize minute objects is required in order to see virus particles. These particles are measured in nanometers , or billionths of a meter. Tobacco mosaic virus , a medium-sized plant virus, is 300 nanometers long - you’d have to line up 84,600 particles of Tobacco mosaic virus to create a line one inch long!
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern