consumerbtopic9n

Consumerbtopic9n - Consumer Behavior Topic 9 Communication and Persuasion Behavior Modification Techniques Communication Theory how to persuade

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Consumer Behavior Topic 9 Communication and Persuasion: Behavior Modification Techniques Communication Theory – how to persuade people. A great deal of research was conducted during World War II as the government studied how to create effective propaganda. Several different research teams were also working on the first prototypes of computers to try to succeed at sending accurate messages (i.e., plot the projectile for a weapon so as to hit a moving target as in ground guns shooting at flying planes). The Shannon and Weaver Model is one of the classic communication models. Shannon and Weaver were working at Bell Laboratories at this time. Their model starts with a sender who encodes a message and sends it through a channel to a receiver who decodes it and responds. However there are elements that disrupt the chain, such as static. One of the solutions has been to build in redundancy to overcome miscomprehension from incompletely received messages. Other research has focused on source credibility and what makes someone a credible source. Having the ability to persuade is an important quality – that they exude trustworthiness. Some characteristics that enforce trustworthiness include expertise, similarity to the audience, likeability, personal attractiveness and dynamism. Many studies have been done on trustworthiness (i.e., an early one from the Public Opinion Quarterly in 1951; two different groups – one group given message from a trustworthy source and the degree of opinion change was measured vs. the other group who were given a message from a typically unworthy source [ a Soviet newspaper] and clearly the degree of opinion change was far greater with group one. However over time the message from the low credible source is remembered while the high credibility source superiority decreases and the source is forgotten though the messages are remembered – unless the source is reinstated – this is referred to as the “ sleeper effect ” as when you forget that something is a secret and you tell others. There are other ways to increase trustworthiness, such as good sources or to take a low credible source and make it high (i.e., take an x-convict who speaks about stricter laws regarding crime and longer terms; a waiter who tells you what to order off the menu). Another way to improve credibility is to make believe people have “overheard” a
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2012 for the course ECON 322 taught by Professor Francisco during the Fall '07 term at Rutgers.

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Consumerbtopic9n - Consumer Behavior Topic 9 Communication and Persuasion Behavior Modification Techniques Communication Theory how to persuade

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