Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups

Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups

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Thursday, August 25, 2011 24% Growth from 2009 to 2010 Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups Richard Fry, Senior Research Associate FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: 1615 L St, N.W., Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 Tel (202) 419-3600 Fax (202) 419-3608 info@pewhispanic.org www.pewhispanic.org Copyright © 2011
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1 Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups Pew Hispanic Center | www.pewhispanic.org About the Pew Hispanic Center The Pew Hispanic Center is a nonpartisan research organization that seeks to improve public understanding of the diverse Hispanic population in the United States and to chronicle Latinos' growing impact on the nation. It does not take positions on policy issues. The Center is part of the Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan "fact tank" based in Washington, D.C., and it is funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts, a Philadelphia-based public charity. All of the Center’s reports are available at www.pewhispanic.org . The staff of the Pew Hispanic Center is: Paul Taylor, Director Rakesh Kochhar, Associate Director for Research Richard Fry, Senior Research Associate Gretchen Livingston, Senior Researcher Seth Motel, Research Assistant Mark Hugo Lopez, Associate Director Jeffrey S. Passel, Senior Demographer Gabriel Velasco, Research Analyst Mary Seaborn, Administrative Manager Eileen Patten, Research Assistant
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2 Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups Pew Hispanic Center | www.pewhispanic.org About this Report This report is based on estimates of college enrollment from the October Current Population Survey (CPS). The CPS is the standard source for national estimates of rates of college enrollment and has collected college enrollment information in a consistent manner since 1947. The 2010 estimates are based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the recently released October 2010 CPS data. Estimates for prior years are from the historical school enrollment tables available on the U.S. Census Bureau website: http://www.census.gov/hhes/school/data/cps/historical/index.html . This report focuses on college enrollment by race and ethnicity. The Census Bureau’s historical college enrollment tables by race and ethnicity are limited to the 18- to 24-year-old population. Most of this report refers to trends in college enrollment among that age group. The CPS is nationally representative of the civilian non-institutionalized population. For many groups, estimated educational attainment levels and school enrollment do not significantly diverge whether based on the civilian non-institutionalized population or the total resident population. However, for the young black population, particularly young black males, estimates of high school completion, dropping out, and college enrollment may be sensitive to the sample universe ( Heckman and LaFontaine, 2007 ).
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2012 for the course LTNS 415 taught by Professor Henriquez during the Fall '11 term at S.F. State.

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Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups

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