US v. Nixon Brief

US v. Nixon Brief - Con Law 401 United States v. Nixon ,...

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Unformatted text preview: Con Law 401 United States v. Nixon , 418 US 683 (1974) Facts of the Case: On June 17 th , 1972, burglars broke into the Democratic Partys campaign headquarters in the Watergate building complex in Washington, DC. After suspicions arose, President Nixon appointed a special prosecutor to investigate the case. After a grand jury indicted seven of Nixons aides for crimes including obstruction of justice and conspiracy to defraud the United States, the prosecutor, Leon Jaworski, sought a subpoena for tapes of conversations involving Nixon and White House officials that might serve as evidence for his involvement in the break- in. President Nixon claimed that because of executive privilege, he was immune to the subpoena: that he could withhold information to protect the national interest. In District Court, Jaworski got his subpoena, and Nixons office only turned over edited transcripts of portions of conversations. Nixon promptly appealed to the Court of Appeals, and then both Jaworski and Nixons lawyer appealed to the Supreme Court....
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US v. Nixon Brief - Con Law 401 United States v. Nixon ,...

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