Critical Thinking - Mandi Jordan Critical Thinking Exercise 3 Human Growth Development 1 Briefly give an example how recent research refutes some

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Mandi Jordan Critical Thinking Exercise 3 1. Briefly give an example how recent research refutes some of Piaget’s understanding of preschool children’s abilities. Within the pre-operational stage, Piaget identified a characteristic that he stated as "egocentrism." This is the child’s failure to see the world from another’s viewpoint. They are quite plainly self-centered. Piaget revealed that until the age of seven, a child is incapable of perceiving a different viewpoint, from its own and is thus said to be egocentric. Piaget saw many of the difficulties of the pre-operational stage child causing this inability to "de-center". Psychologists such as Meadows (1988) have proposed that Piaget misjudged the cognitive abilities of children. Meadows believed that Piaget disregarded individual differences in his studies. It has also been debated that Piaget disregarded both emotional and social influences on cognitive development. One aspect of Piaget’s work which has repeatedly come under criticism is his methodology. In his research he used basic question and answer methods. But his questions were not standardized or personalized to the individual. Additionally, he used no statistical analysis of his results. This makes them very difficult to explain and to make comparisons between children. It has been suggested that the instructions given to the children in Piaget’s experiments were possibly difficult for children to understand, and easily misunderstood. Piaget asked the children the same questions more than once, and it has been debated that this could quite possibly cause confusion as it may have led the children to believe that the original answer that they gave was incorrect. 2. Briefly explain the difference between traditional education and Montessori approach. Montessori approach- * Views the child holistically, valuing cognitive, psychological, social, and spiritual development. *Child is an active participant in learning, allowed to move about and respectfully explore the classroom environment; teacher is an instructional facilitator and guide. *A carefully prepared learning environment and method encourages development of internal self-discipline and intrinsic motivation. * Instruction, both individual and group, adapts to students' learning styles and developmental levels. * Three-year span of age grouping, three-year cycles allow teacher, students, and parents to develop supportive, collaborative and trusting relationships. * Grace, courtesy, and conflict resolution are integral parts of daily Montessori peace curriculum. * Values concentration and depth of experience; supplies uninterrupted time for focused
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2012 for the course HUMAN GROW DEP2004/77 taught by Professor Calwell during the Spring '12 term at nwfsc.edu.

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Critical Thinking - Mandi Jordan Critical Thinking Exercise 3 Human Growth Development 1 Briefly give an example how recent research refutes some

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