Topic+07.1++Sec+04+March+9

Topic+07.1++Sec+04+March+9 - Recap: Signal detection theory...

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Recap: Signal detection theory and memory Scenario: subjects study target materials At test, targets and “lures” or “distractors” are  presented Subject responds “Old” / “Yes” or something similar  for stimuli recognized as targets Subject responds “New” / “No” for stimuli NOT  recognized as targets 04/02/12 Topic 07 Retention and Retrieval 1
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Responses at test are classified Hits: correct recognitions of targets Misses: failure to recognize targets False alarms: incorrect recognition of lures as targets Correct rejections: correct rejection of lures 04/02/12 Topic 07 Retention and Retrieval 2
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Recap: d’ is a key signal detection theory parameter d’ as an operational definition of memory strength – d’ = z  (H)  – z  (FA) Example:  hit rate = .80, z = 0.842 false alarm rate = .40, z = -0.253 d’ = 0.842 - - 0.253 = 1.095 04/02/12 Topic 07 Retention and Retrieval 3
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Signal detection theory attributes responses to Sensitivity of the responder Greater memory strength will lead to greater  sensitivity Bias – which must be taken into account to  determine sensitivity 04/02/12 Topic 07 Retention and Retrieval 4
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Different learning / detection / diagnosis scenarios may vary considerably Discriminability of the signals Highly similar targets and distractors, degraded  signals, will produce lower discriminability, lower  d’ 04/02/12 Topic 07 Retention and Retrieval 5
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04/02/12 Topic 07 Retention and Retrieval 6 Key parameters Beta, Criterion: level of certainty, or familiarity  required for a recognition response; an individual’s  decision rule d’ : index of discriminability (spread between noise  only & signal + noise distributions); for an  individual, a measure of sensitivity
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04/02/12 Topic 07 Retention and Retrieval 7 Two-Factor or dual process theory of recognition Contextual, temporal and frequency judgments may be based  on either the retrieval of semantic/contextual associations or  a familiarity judgment. Atkinson Juola (1974) Model Tulving Model
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04/02/12 Topic 07 Retention and Retrieval 8 Atkinson-Juola Model Stage 1: Check if input is very familiar or unfamiliar.
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2012 for the course PSYCHOLOGY Cognition taught by Professor Ingate during the Spring '10 term at Rutgers.

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Topic+07.1++Sec+04+March+9 - Recap: Signal detection theory...

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