Chapter 3 Questions and Answers - Sound of Silence

Chapter 3 Questions and Answers - Sound of Silence -...

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1. What is lost if ‘miles’ is substituted for lands (2), or ‘cheap’ for ‘frugal’ (7)? If ‘miles’ were to be substituted for ‘lands,’ it wouldn’t give put the same picture in the reader’s mind of being in a far-off place. The word ‘miles’ has the connotation of being slightly far away from some place familiar. However the word ‘lands’ brings the connotation of being in an unknown place or world. When reading a book, the reader is taken into a different place, and by using the word ‘miles’ the poem would not have the same effect if it were to replace the word ‘lands’ in the line “To take us lands away.” If ‘cheap’ were to be substituted for the word ‘frugal’ the word cheap would give off the connotation of being of little value. But the line “How frugal is the chariot” is not saying that the chariot is of little value. It is saying the chariot is not expensive. Although the words ‘cheap’ and ‘frugal’ generally have the same denotation, they do not have the same connotations. 2. How is prancing (4) peculiarly appropriate to poetry as well as to coursers? Could the poet have without loss compared a book to coursers and poetry to a frigate?* Prancing is peculiarly appropriate to both poetry and coursers because the word prancing means to either ‘To spring or bound forward in a manner reminiscent of a spirited horse’ or ‘To walk or move about spiritedly; strut.’ Coursers are swift horses, and the word prancing applies to it because word prancing not only has the denotation of ‘spirited horses’, but it also brings the connotation of horses and speed. The word also applies to poetry because poetry can also be ‘prancing.’ Poetry has a rhythm, temp and pulse to it (e.g. 4 lines in each stanza, 8 syllables in each line), much like a horse has a rhythm when it prances. In this way, we could say poetry is ‘prancing’ when it is read. The poet could have compared a book to coursers and poetry to a frigate because ‘coursers’ means swift horses, and frigates are fast, light vessels. Both words bring the idea of speed and quickness, and because the poet does not intend to for the concrete meanings of the words to be used, there would be little lost in comparing books to coursers and poetry to a frigate because both words would bring the same connotation. 3. Is this account appropriate to all kinds of poetry or just to certain kinds? I believe this account is only appropriate to certain kinds of poetry. The subjects of the poem must be closely related in to order to change the descriptive words from one subject (such as poetry) to another (books). Poetry that compares literature to other topics is generally the only kind of poetry that can alter words from one stanza to another. Adding or changing comparisons of literature actually adds to the poem because the reader is able to relate to the poem itself in regards to imagination and imagery. The World is Too Much With Us
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Chapter 3 Questions and Answers - Sound of Silence -...

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