Intelligence and language pysc 2000

Intelligence and language pysc 2000 - Language and...

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PSYC 2000 Language and Intelligence
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Language and Thought Module 32
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Language Structure Phoneme – smallest distinctive unit of sound (e.g., a, g, t) Morpheme – smallest unit of language that carries a meaning (e.g., prefixes and suffixes) Grammar – a system of rules that allows us to communicate with each other
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Introduction to Intelligence Module 33
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Intelligence The ability to learn from experience, solve problems, and use knowledge to adapt to new situations IQ—a score once obtained on a particular intelligence test It’s a concept, not a “thing” In research studies, intelligence is whatever the intelligence test measures. This tends to be “school smarts.”
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Intelligence But—Is intelligence a single overall ability or is it several specific abilities? Disagreement among psychologists
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General Intelligence: g factor Spearman proposed that general intelligence (g) underlies various types of intelligence. He noted that high scores on separate tests tend to correlate with each other. Example, people who do well on vocabulary examinations do well on paragraph comprehension examinations, a cluster that helps define verbal intelligence Other factors include a spatial ability factor, or a reasoning ability factor
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Primary Mental Abilities L. L. Thurstone, a critic of Spearman, analyzed his subjects NOT on a single scale of general intelligence, but on seven clusters of primary mental abilities , including: 1. Word Fluency 2. Verbal Comprehension 3. Spatial Ability 4. Perceptual Speed 5. Numerical Ability 6. Inductive Reasoning 7. Memory Later psychologists analyzed Thurstone’s data and found a weak relationship between these clusters, suggesting some evidence of a g factor.
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Theory of Multiple Intelligences Howard Gardner proposes eight types of intelligences Brain damage may diminish one type of ability but not others ( savant syndrome )
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Theory of Multiple Intelligences Sternberg (1985, 1999, 2003) suggests three intelligences rather than eight. 1. Analytical intelligence : Assessed by intelligence tests. Well-defined problems with a clear answer 2. Creative intelligence : Intelligence that makes us adapt to novel situations, generating novel ideas. 3. Practical intelligence : Intelligence required for everyday tasks (e.g., street smart, delegating tasks). Also emphasizes the process underlying thinking rather than just the product.
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Intelligence and Creativity Creativity is the ability to produce ideas that are both novel and valuable. It correlates somewhat with intelligence. 1. Expertise- well bases knowledge in some area 2. Imaginative Thinking-ability to see things in creative ways 3. A Venturesome Personality-seeking new experiences; stray form typical mindset 4. Intrinsic Motivation-wanting to do something because you want to within yourself; not for a prize 5. A Creative Environment-being somewhere when you can create naturally; not suppressed
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2012 for the course PYSC 2000 taught by Professor Munson during the Fall '10 term at LSU.

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Intelligence and language pysc 2000 - Language and...

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