motivation and work pysc 2000

motivation and work pysc 2000 - Motivation and Work PSY C...

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PSYC 2000 Motivation and Work
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Introduction to Motivation Module 36
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Motivation Motivation  is a need or desire that energizes behavior and  directs it towards a goal. When you are motivated, you do something. Your emotions can strengthen or weaken your motivation.
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Perspectives on Motivation Four perspectives to explain motivation include the following: 1. Instinct Theory 2. Drive-Reduction Theory 3. Arousal Theory 4. Hierarchy of Motives
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Instinct Theory Instincts are unlearned and fixed patterns of behavior common to all members of a species Where the woman can build different kinds of houses the bird builds only one kind of nest.
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A physiological need creates an aroused tension state (a drive) that motivates an organism to satisfy the need (Hull, 1951) Replaced Instinct Theory Drive-Reduction Theory
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Drive-Reduction Theory The physiological aim of drive reduction is homeostasis—the maintenance of a steady internal state E.g., maintenance of steady body temperature or food intake Food Drive Reduction Organism Stomach Full Empty Stomach (Food Deprived)
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Where our needs push , incentives (positive or negative stimuli) pull us in reducing our drives. E.g., a food-deprived person who smells baking bread (incentive) feels a strong hunger drive. Drive Reduction Theory: Incentives
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Drive Reduction – Failure to Explain Does not provide a comprehensive framework for understanding motivation We often behave in ways that increase rather than reduce a drive. When dieting you may skip a meal (which will only increase your drive) We take challenging courses, have families, work challenging job, ….that do not decrease tension but rather increase them) Why? o Perhaps we need arousal….
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Human motivation aims not to eliminate arousal but to seek optimum levels of arousal (neither too high nor too low) Arousal Theory—Optimum Arousal
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Abraham Maslow (1970) suggested that certain needs have priority over others. Physiological needs like
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motivation and work pysc 2000 - Motivation and Work PSY C...

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