personality pysc 2000

personality pysc 2000 - Personality PSY C 2000 Personality...

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PSYC 2000 Personality
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Personality An individual’s characteristic Pattern of thinking, feeling, and acting. This section reviews: Psychoanalytic theory Humanistic theory Contemporary research
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The Psychoanalytic Perspective Module 45
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Psychodynamic Perspective Freud encountered patients suffering from nervous disorders whose complaints could not be explained in terms of purely physical causes. This led him to develop the first comprehensive theory of personality which included the Unconscious mind, psychosexual stages, and defense mechanisms. Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) C u l v e r P i c t s
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Model of Mind The mind is like an iceberg Mostly hidden and below the surface lies the unconscious mind The preconscious stores temporary memories
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Exploring the Unconscious Freud believed the unconscious was a reservoir of mostly unacceptable thoughts, wishes, feelings and memories (e.g., sexual or aggressive impulses). He thought that the neurological symptoms he observed could be explained by unconscious conflicts. E.g., unexplained blindness or deafness might be caused by not wanting to see or hearing something that aroused anxiety.
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Psychoanalysis Freud developed techniques that he thought would tap into repressed desires and unconscious conflicts. Free association —Freud asked patients to say whatever came to their mind, in order to tap the unconscious. Dream interpretation —analyzing the manifest content of dreams to make inferences about latent meanings. Freudian slips Freudian slips II
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Id, Ego, and Superego ID unconsciously strives to satisfy basic sexual and aggressive drives operating on the pleasure principle, demanding immediate gratification . Superego provides standards for judgment (the conscience ) and for future aspirations. Largely conscious, ego functions as the “executive ” and mediates the demands of id and superego.
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Personality Structure Personality develops as a result of our efforts to resolve conflicts between our biological impulses (ID) and social restraints (superego) .
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Imagine this scenario… Jack’s mother baked a tray of delicious- smelling cookies. She put them on a tray on the counter to cool, and warned Jack that he had better not touch the cookies while they cool, because they are a special treat for his sister’s birthday party. Jack loves his sister, and wants her to be happy; but he looked at the cookies and just couldn’t help himself. He took half of them and ran off to his room.
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Freud say is dominating in this scenario? 1.
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2012 for the course PYSC 2000 taught by Professor Munson during the Fall '10 term at LSU.

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personality pysc 2000 - Personality PSY C 2000 Personality...

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