6. “The sight of the awful and majestic in nature had indeed always the effect of solemnizin

6. “The sight of the awful and majestic in nature had indeed always the effect of solemnizin

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Kevin Ho 6. “The sight of the awful and majestic in nature had indeed always the effect of solemnizing my mind and causing me to forget the passing cares of life” (Shelley) Name: Kevin Ho Student Number:211546587 Section: A Tutorial leader: William Gleberzon Tutorial number: 02 Assignment type: Essay Date: 07/03/12 AP/HUMA 1720 6.00 The Roots of Western Culture. The Modern Period 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Kevin Ho York University 6. “The sight of the awful and majestic in nature had indeed always the effect of solemnizing my mind and causing me to forget the passing cares of life” (Shelley) Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein was published anonymously in the early 1800s during the Romantic Movement that had begun in the late 1700s in Western Europe and England. As a romantic, Mary Shelly favors simplicity and naturalness. She idealizes rural spaces rather than the cities. She sees civilization as a corrupt influence on humanity rather than a positive force. In the novel, natural beauty often has a smoothening effect on the characters, particularly Frankenstein. This quote from the protagonist, Victor, aligns with the Romantic Movement, which emphasized a turn to nature for sublime experience—feelings of awe, hope, and ecstasy. It demonstrates how the beauty in nature allays Victor’s pain caused by the recent death and loss of his family, as well as how it helps him cope with the consequences of his actions . In the context of this quote, Victor is tormented by Justine’s execution and William’s death. He is wracked with guilt and becomes increasingly depressed: “Justine died; she rested; and I was alive. The blood flowed freely in my veins but a weight of despair and remorse pressed on my heart, which nothing can remove” (Shelley, 1992, P.93). In addition, he also fears the havoc his creature could wreak. He has the “obscure feeling that all was not over, and that he would still commit some signal crime” (Shelley, 1992, P.95). He contemplates suicide but
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/02/2012 for the course HUMA 1720 taught by Professor Gleberzon during the Spring '12 term at York University.

Page1 / 5

6. “The sight of the awful and majestic in nature had indeed always the effect of solemnizin

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online