Abstract 3 - uses its own perspectives on history and justice to go about this Making the self-fill the role of the virtuous righteous one while

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A social-psychological approach to conflict analysis and resolution By Herbert c Kelman Abstract Recognizing conflict as a dynamic process, it is shaped through the change of relation, interest, and reality between two or more parties. International conflict is shaped by needs and fears of the group rather than using logic and calculations. These conflicts arise when there is a threat to the fulfillment of basic need such as: food, shelter, wellness, safety, etc. To reach a resolution to such conflicts requires an environment for negotiation in order to reach a binding agreement. Using positive incentives helps this process where each party meets the other’s needs. Each usually
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Unformatted text preview: uses its own perspectives on history and justice to go about this. Making the self-fill the role of the virtuous righteous one, while keeping the other side in a “demonic enemy” role. Diminishing mistrust in a collaborative setting is rooted in understanding the nature of conflict. This case is of international conflict specifically, but can be applied in the realm of collaboration as well. This type of international conflict faces a disparity in culture, language, etc. This disparity perpetuates a country to look a problem and try to solve it with its own sense of history and justice. This is a selective perception of right and wrong....
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2012 for the course COMMUNICAT 313 taught by Professor Herk during the Spring '12 term at Rutgers.

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