30A-classical-literature-odyssey.1-6.12

30A-classical-literature-odyssey.1-6.12 - Fall 2012...

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Fall 2012 Comparative Literature 30A: Major Works of European Literature Classical and Medieval Literature from Homer to Dante Prof. Wolf Kittler e-mail: [email protected] Time Tuesday, Thursday 12:30-01:45 Room Buchanan 1910 Office hours Thursday 11:00-12:00, or by appointment Phelps Hall, 6th floor, room 6315
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Material: Papyrus Egypt 3000 BCE Format: Scroll Material: Parchment Greece 5th century BCE Format:Codex Pergamon 3rd century BCE Material: Paper China 2nd century CE Europe 12th century CE
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Dead See Scrolls, Qumran
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Nag Hammadi, Egypt
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Fragments of the Odyssey, most likely copied in Alexandria
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Homer, Odyssey 1, 289-312 (P.Duk.inv. 768 R)
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Fragment from Homer's Odysseyis dating from between the third century to the second century BCE. One 2000 papyrus fragments housed at Columbia.
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Oxyrhynchus 748: Homer's Iliad, 1, 107-116, (End of Lines)
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Oxyrhynchus 752: Homer's Iliad, 4, 87-96,(Fragmentary)
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Homer, Odyssey 9, 295 -309; 344 – 384; Odyssey 11, 273 – 282; 30 BC – 640 CE
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Sappho, fragment 98, 3rd century BCE
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Oxyrhynchus 875: Sophocles' Antigone, Lines 242-246
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Unknown (scribe), Manuscript Fragment from Sophocles’ Ichneutai , Papyrus, Late 2nd BC, Roman
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Homer, Odyssey , 15th century: London, British Library, MS Harley 6325, f 1r
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Virgil, Georgics and Bucolics(The Palatine Virgil). In Latin, Fifth or sixth century
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Vellum Manuscript of Ovid in the Vatican
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Ovid, Metamorphoses, Cologny Fondation Martin Bodmer Cod. Bodmer 124
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http://wiredforbooks.org/iliad/
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Tell me Muse, of the man versatile and resourceful, who wandered Many a sea-mile after he ransacked Troy’s holy city. Many the men whose towns he observed, whose minds he discovered, Many the pains in his heart he suffered, traversing the sea-way, Fighting for his own life and a way back home for his comrades. Not even so did he save his companions, as much as he wished to, For by their own mad recklessness they were brought to destruction, Childish fools – they decided to eat up the cows of the High Lord, Helios: he then took from the men the day of returning. Even for us, holy daughter of Zeus, start to recount this. (I. 1-10)
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Then there were others, whoever escaped from the sheer destruction, All in their homes, since they had escaped from the war and the deep sea; Only the one still yearned to go home, still wanted his woman; Queenly Kalypso, a nymph and illustrious goddess, was holding Him in her spacious cavern; she wanted to make him her husband. (I. 11-15) … all the gods took pity upon him, All but Poseidon, who hated with deep unquenchable anger Godlike Odysseus, until he arrived at last in his country. (I. 19-21) … his heart was moved to reflect on faultless Aigisthos, Whom Agamemnon’s child had killed, far-honored Orestes. (I. 29-30)
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“… ‘Send home steadfast-hearted Odysseus, that he may return now.’ Meanwhile I will go down into Ithaca, so as to rouse his son about him much more and to put more strength in his spirit. When to assembly he summons his long-haired men, the Achaians,
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2012 for the course CLIT 30A taught by Professor Wolfe during the Winter '12 term at UCSB.

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30A-classical-literature-odyssey.1-6.12 - Fall 2012...

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