NEWST VERSION- Lab 6

NEWST VERSION- Lab 6 - Lab 6 Absolute Zero Performed On Due...

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Lab 6: Absolute Zero Performed On: 02/17/2012 Due On: 02/24/2012 Names: Brian Wilhelm Andy Gutting Weston Wands Brian Cosey David Bonsaver Abstract:
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The purpose of this experiment was to find an approximation of the value of absolute zero on the Celsius scale using two different methods, Isobaric and Isochoric. As shown in the attached graphs, the Isochoric (constant Volume) method resulted in a temperature of -292.14 °C, while the Isobaric (constant pressure) method approximated the temperature of absolute zero to be -292.73 °C. Both of these are about 7% lower than the accepted value of -273.15 °C, although the Isochoric method was more accurate, varying from the actual value by 18 °C. Introduction: The purpose of this lab was to approximate experimentally the value of absolute zero (although this is currently a known value). In addition, the procedures in this lab tested the accuracy of the disparate methods for obtaining these values. This lab utilized two experimental methods to determine a generalized formula for the temperature, in degrees Celsius, of absolute zero. The first method is the Isobaric method. This uses a constant pressure gas thermometer and is designed to test Charles’ Law. According to this law, gas tends to expand as it becomes heated in such a manner that the pressure is directly proportional to the temperature. Stated mathematically, this gives equation (1). V α T (1) It is also possible to know the relationship between the gas’s temperature and pressure while keeping the volume constant. This is known as the Isochoric method, or the constant volume gas thermometer experiment. The relationship between temperature and pressure is given by equation (2). P α T (2) Maintaining a constant in the experiments, whether it is volume or pressure, allows for manipulation of the temperature of both while comparing the relationships between the two. There should theoretically be a way to relate all three of these variables, since volume and pressure are rarely constant in real-world experiments. This relationship is given by the “ideal gas law,” and is quite accurate at describing more conventional situations. This gas law is listed below, in equation (3) PV = nRT (3) P Pressure in Pascals V Volume in m 3 n Number of moles of gas R Ideal gas constant (8.314 J/K*mol) T Temperature in Kelvin 22
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Procedure: This lab had two distinct sections that both produce a measurement for absolute zero measured in degrees Celsius. The first section involved a constant pressure gas thermometer while the second section involved a constant volume gas thermometer. Both of these systems are describe in the following section of the lab report. Constant Pressure Gas Thermometer:
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2012 for the course PHY 252 taught by Professor Treacy during the Spring '08 term at ASU.

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NEWST VERSION- Lab 6 - Lab 6 Absolute Zero Performed On Due...

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