InfluencingResponses6 - Influencing Responses PSY364 Dr....

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Influencing Responses PSY364 Dr. Bradbury Fall 2011
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Listening Versus Influencing Listening responses : responding to client messages from client’s point of view Influencing responses: move beyond client’s frame of reference ; include clinician-generated data and perceptions Influencing responses are active rather than passive helper-directed vs. client-centered Listening responses: influence client indirectly; influencing responses exert more direct influence
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Six Influencing Responses 1) Questions 2) Interpretations 3) Information giving 4) Immediacy 5) Self-disclosure 6) Confrontation Egan (2007) suggests that influencing responses help clients see need for change and action through more objective frame of reference
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Social Influence Legitimate, expert, and referent power promote attitude change Legitimate power occurs as result of helper’s role and trustworthiness Expert power results from helper’s competence and expertness Referent power drawn from dimensions such as interpersonal attractiveness, friendliness, and similarity between helper and client
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Influencing Responses and Timing Sensitive timing crucial Important to first listen to client and establish rapport Premature use of directive influencing responses may lead to denial, defensiveness, or termination of therapy Consider variables of “reactance,” race, and ethnicity Some racial/ethnic minority clients appear more comfortable with active and directive communication style (e.g., American Indians, Asian Americans, Black Americans, and Hispanic Americans)
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Reactance Reactance related to need to preserve sense of freedom Clients high in reactance are generally oppositional and motivated to do opposite of what helper suggests Trait of reactance tends to be consistent across time and settings Reactant clients likely to be more uncomfortable with influencing responses regardless of when introduced in helping process With such clients, less directive responses are associated with better therapeutic outcomes
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What Does Influencing Require? Accurate and effective listening depends on ability of helpers to listen to clients and restrain some of their own energy and expressiveness In contrast, influencing responses require helpers to be more expressive and challenging Akin to responding to ‘sour notes’ (Egan, 2007) Helpers must risk upsetting clients and be able to tolerate client disapproval and disagreement Helpers who opt to remain passive may in fact be covertly colluding with client in manner that is ultimately counter-therapeutic
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2012 for the course PSY 364 taught by Professor Telch during the Spring '06 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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InfluencingResponses6 - Influencing Responses PSY364 Dr....

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