chapter3_part2 - Molecules of Life Chapter 3 Part 2 3.5...

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Molecules of Life Chapter 3 Part 2
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3.5 Proteins – Diversity in Structure and Function Proteins are the most diverse biological molecule (structural, nutritious, enzyme, transport, communication, and defense proteins) Cells build thousands of different proteins by stringing together amino acids in different orders
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Proteins and Amino Acids Protein An organic compound composed of one or more chains of amino acids Amino acid A small organic compound with an amine group (—NH 3 + ), a carboxyl group (—COO - , the acid), and one or more variable groups (R group)
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Amino Acid Structure
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Fig. 3-15, p. 44 amine group carboxyl group valine
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Polypeptides Protein synthesis involves the formation of amino acid chains called polypeptides Polypeptide A chain of amino acids bonded together by peptide bonds in a condensation reaction between the amine group of one amino acid and the carboxyl group of another amino acid
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Peptide Bond Formation
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Fig. 3-16a, p. 44
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Fig. 3-16a, p. 44 A DNA encodes the order of amino acids in a new polypeptide chain. Methionine (met) is typically the first amino acid. B In a condensation reaction, a peptide bond forms between the methionine and the next amino acid, alanine (ala) in this example. Leucine (leu) will be next. Think about polarity, charge, and other properties of functional groups that become neighbors in the growing chain.
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Fig. 3-16b, p. 45
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Fig. 3-16b, p. 45 C A peptide bond forms between the alanine and leucine. Tryptophan (trp) will be next. The chain is starting to twist and fold as atoms swivel around some bonds and attract or repel their neighbors. D The sequence of amino acid subunits in this newly forming peptide chain is now met–ala–leu–trp. The process may continue until there are hundreds or thousands of amino acids in the chain.
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Fig. 3-16a, p. 44 A DNA encodes the order of amino acids in a new polypeptide chain. Methionine (met) is typically the first amino acid. B In a condensation reaction, a peptide bond forms between the methionine and the next amino acid, alanine (ala) in this example. Leucine (leu) will be next. Think about polarity, charge, and other properties of functional groups that become neighbors in the growing chain.
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2012 for the course BIO 100 taught by Professor Corbet during the Spring '12 term at Paradise Valley Community College .

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chapter3_part2 - Molecules of Life Chapter 3 Part 2 3.5...

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