Brain Compatible Learning Tabitha Floyd PSY 370

Brain Compatible Learning Tabitha Floyd PSY 370

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Brain Compatible Learning Environments Tabitha Floyd PSY 370 Cindy Hopper April 25, 2011
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Brain Compatible Learning Environments Brain compatible learning environments are used to help better educate students. It has been proved that a student’s ability to learn is limited when they are threatened, embarrassed, or ridiculed. That means that students learn best when there is an absence of threat, immediate feedback, an enriched environment, adequate time, collaboration, choices, and meaningful lessons. “The brain is a vastly complex and adaptive system with hundreds of billions of neurons and interneuron’s that can generate an astronomical number of neural nets, or groups of neurons acting in concert, from which our daily experience is constructed. Many findings seem obvious and intuitive, as one outsider asked me, "isn’t all learning brain-based?" For example, we all know intuitively that the best age to learn a new language is during our early childhood; what neuroscientists call the principle of windows of opportunity. We can accept that all brains are unique and a product of interactions with different environments, generating a lifetime of different and varied experiences; what scientists call plasticity. We can accept the notion that either you use it, or you lose it; new neural pathways are created every time we use our brains in thinking through problems, but are lost forever – are pruned – if we do not use them (Lackney, Jeffery A. Ph.D. 12 Design Principles Based on Brain-based Learning Research, Retrieved on April 23,2011from http://www.designshare.com/Research/BrainBasedLearn98.htm) .” Brain compatible environments needs to consist of color, texture, displays created by students so students have connection and ownership of the product. The room should have the
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ability to teach through group learning. Things like table groupings to facilitate social learning and stimulate the social brain. Use your entire environment indoor and outdoor to enhance movement, engaging the motor cortex linked to the cerebral cortex, for oxygenation. Make sure you use space to set up a variety of places of different shapes, color, light, nooks & crannies. This help meet the needs of different learning abilities. (Jensen, 2008) The brain has the ability to express its pattern-making behavior. This means you need to find links in learning to help the brain better understand the meanings. Learning is best accomplished when the learning activity is connected directly to an experience. We remember best when learning is done in a natural, real-life environment. When planning activities and lesson plans we need to think about how we can take the lesson and make it more real to the students. That leads me
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Brain Compatible Learning Tabitha Floyd PSY 370

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