Literature Program Tabitha Floyd ECE335

Literature Program Tabitha Floyd ECE335

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Literature Program Tabitha Floyd ECE335: Children’s Literature Instructor: Julie Hacker November 15 th , 2010
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Literature Program As a preschool teacher teaching a class of 3-5 year olds, it is important to have a literature program which will include developmentally appropriate approaches to teaching and learning. It is important as an educators to use a range of activities- including discussion, debate, research, role-playing, and journal keeping to prompt and nurture students in these stages. ” It is very important to supply all these activities if we are going to meet each child needs on their own level and give them the opportunity to have a meaningful connection to language and literacy. In this literature program we will need to look at the developmental levels of children three to five. The developmental levels that need to be address are language, intellectual, personality, social and moral, aesthetic and creative. These all have an important role in the literature program. We will start with language development. The program needs to address language development in a fun and interesting way to get your students involved. Story time is very important to language development. Story time gives children the opportunity to understand other people through the story. It also helps them to develop positive attitudes towards books. This also increases there vocabulary and there desire to read. A goal of the teacher in story telling is to set an example. The children learn by watching the teacher they learn how to follow along reading from left to right and top to bottom. As the story is being told they learn the relationship between spoken and printed words. They also learn to listen. Books can help children learn letters, numbers and language. Books also provide models of acceptable behavior
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and positive social relationships. (Floyd, 2010) When it comes to story telling it is an important role that the teacher chooses books that draws on children’s background and helps them understands them better. This helps them learn words that describe feelings and experiences they are having. The next role of the teacher is to get the children involved in the story. Give an introduction, in the introduction use props and pictures to get the children’s attention. When reading a story use changes in your voice tones to add interest to what is being read. Ask question while you are read to make sure the children understand the story. At the end of the story use props again, ask more questions and let the children retell the story. (Floyd, 2010) Retelling the story is great support for language and creative development. To do this you should let the children use role playing and puppetry. Using puppets in the classroom allows children to explore the various ways of retelling and comprehension in their own creative way. It provides a creative outlet for students to express the emotions and feelings being told and taught in the story. http://www.ehow.com/how_5226628_use-puppet-classroom.html#ixzz14Ll7Lt00
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2012 for the course PHY 372 taught by Professor Melanierodriguez during the Spring '12 term at Ashford University.

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Literature Program Tabitha Floyd ECE335

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