37_new - Ch1-H3 florin (56950) This print-out should have...

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Ch1-H3 – florin – (56950) 1 This print-out should have 27 questions. Multiple-choice questions may continue on the next column or page – find all choices before answering. 001 (part 1 of 2) 10.0 points Powerful sports cars can go from zero to 25 m/s (about 60 mph) in 5 seconds. What is the magnitude of the acceleration? Answer in m / s 2 . Answer in units of m / s 2 002 (part 2 of 2) 10.0 points How does this compare with the acceleration of a falling rock? 1. It is about half the acceleration of a falling rock. 2. The acceleration of a falling rock increases as it falls, so the question is not meaningful. 3. It is much less than the acceleration of a falling rock. 4. It is much greater than the acceleration of a falling rock. Before After ~v f ~v i Notice that this ball only has motion in the x direction, so the change in momentum will be of the form ~p = h ~p x , 0 , 0 O. Find ~p x . Answer in kg · m / s. Answer in units of kg · m / s 004 (part 2 of 2) 10.0 points What is the change in the magnitude of the tennis ball’s momentum? Answer in kg · m / s. Answer in units of kg · m / s 005 (part 1 of 3) 10.0 points The “red planet,” Mars, has a mass of 6 . 4 × 10 23 kg and travels in a nearly circular orbit around the Sun, as shown in the following figure. 5. It is about twice the acceleration of a falling rock. 6. The two accelerations are about the same. 3
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2012 for the course PHY 303K taught by Professor Turner during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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37_new - Ch1-H3 florin (56950) This print-out should have...

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