Arbacia Punctulata which is native to the Western Atlantic Ocean and can be found in shallow waters

Arbacia Punctulata which is native to the Western Atlantic Ocean and can be found in shallow waters

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Arbacia Punctulata which is native to the Western Atlantic Ocean and can be found in shallow waters at rocky, sandy, or shelly bottoms. A sea urchin embryo would develop faster at higher temperatures and slower at lower temperatures, as long as the heat wasn’t high enough to kill the cell. A higher heat would be more likely to lead to malformed divisions because the processes are taking place so much faster that the cell could
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Unformatted text preview: get ahead of itself when dividing. A colder environment would be more likely to lead to cells not developing at all because it would be too could for intracellular processes to take place at a fast enough rate for development. The natural habitat would most likely have a moderate temperature nearer to room temp water. Maybe warmer if in sunny, shallow waters....
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2012 for the course ECO 304K taught by Professor Hickenbottom during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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