Phuong Lam-Bio 206L Research paper

Phuong Lam-Bio 206L Research paper - Does the limited food...

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Does the limited food resources affect the level of aggression in male crickets? Phuong Lam BIO 206, Spring, 2011 Unique # 48840, Mary-Kay Johnson April 26 th , 2011
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Does the limited food resources affect the level of aggression in male crickets? Abstract: Limited of resources such as shelter, food, air, etc. could lead to many aggressive behavior in animals, including crickets. Crickets have been used as great model organisms for the aggressive behaviors. In this experiment, we have observed roughly about 80 crickets on their aggressive behaviors based on food (variable group) and no food (control group). Crickets were starved for a week before the experiment to see if they were willing to compete for only one food pellet. Hunger can drives the crickets to fight for their survival. The observations were recorded based on 6 behaviors such as latency, antenna fencing, mandible spreading, mandible bite, wing movement, and chirping during the contest between two male crickets. We hypothesized that limited resource lead to more aggressive behavior in order to earn the food. Through out the experiment, we observed that the one who did not get the control of food first tend to start latency to fight for the food. However, the one with the control of food for the longest time seemed to be more aggressive in order to protect his resource. They are what we call the “winner.” Although we saw more aggressive behaviors on the graphs if limited resource (food pellet) was involved between the two male crickets, the T-test of the data has shown that there is not enough evidence (statistically insignificant) in the experiment to prove that level of aggressive behaviors in crickets due to limited resources. Introduction:
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Crickets’ aggressive behaviors have been observed for many years (Alexander, 1961), (Rillich, et al., 2007). Crickets are very convenient models for observing aggressive behavior because not only do many species compete for limited territory, food, and shelter (Hsu, 2006), but they can also display highly aggressive agonistic interactions. Several noteworthy communication methods are displayed during fighting including antennal fencing, mounting, spreading of the mandibles, and mandibles biting (Alexander, 1961), (Briffa, 2008), (Brown, 2006), (Hofmann, Stevenson, 2001), (Stevenson, et al., 1999), (Tachon, et al., 1999), which carry both motivational signals as well as signifying their strength. Other displays observed during combat include body jerking and a rivalry song. Different species differ in the sequence of agonistic behavior, some displaying these behaviors only for competition for survival resources or mating, and others escalating in an encounter with other males or while being isolated for a period of time (lab manuel). Interestingly, frequent competition between male crickets is an essential factor that has led to these types of agonistic behaviors over time (Hack, 1997). Since the most important resources to crickets are territories, food, and mating
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Phuong Lam-Bio 206L Research paper - Does the limited food...

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