Session 7 TVM2

Session 7 TVM2 - Time Value of Money—2 Compounding and...

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Unformatted text preview: Time Value of Money—2 Compounding and Discounting Cash Flow Streams 0 1 2 3 4 Angkor Wat, Cambodia Comments on Horizon Case In Testing Center Th/Fr (closes 11:30 am Friday) What to bring—up to 3 pages (one side = one page) of notes, spreadsheets What is/are the problem(s) to solve? (you decide) How do you solve it (them)? (you decide) What do the following mean? “Surplus”, “Earned Surplus” = Retained Earnings “Extraordinary” = One­time Event “2/10, net 30” “Due from Stockholders” = Loans to Owners Tune­up Problem Your company has received a $50,000 loan from an industrial finance company. The annual payments are $6,202.70. If the company is paying 9% interest per year, how many loan payments must the company make? 12 13 15 19 None of the above Tune­up Problem Your company has received a $50,000 loan from an industrial finance company. The annual payments are $6,202.70. If the company is paying 9% interest per year, how many loan payments must the company make? 12 13 15 (set­up; 50000 PV, ­6202.70 PMT, 9 I/Y, N) 19 None of the above Tune­up Problem­2 Your grandmother invested one lump sum 17 years ago at 4.25 percent annual interest. Today, she gave you the proceeds of that investment which totaled $5,539.92. How much did your grandmother originally invest? a. $2,700.00 b. $2,730.30 c. $2,750.00 d. $2,768.40 e. None of the above Tune­up Problem­2 Your grandmother invested one lump sum 17 years ago at 4.25 percent interest. Today, she gave you the proceeds of that investment which totaled $5,539.92. How much did your grandmother originally invest? a. $2,700.00 b. $2,730.30 (5539.92 FV, 4.25 I/Y, 17 N PV) c. $2,750.00 d. $2,768.40 e. None of the above Other Cash Flow Patterns 0 1 2 3 Perpetuity Suppose you will receive a fixed payment every period (month, year, etc.) forever. This is an example of a perpetuity. You can think of a perpetuity as an annuity that goes on forever. Present Value of a Perpetuity Present Value of a Perpetuity When we find the PV of an annuity, we think of the following relationship: PV = PMT (PVIFA i, n ) Mathematically (PVIFA i, n ) = 0 1- 1 n (1 + i) i 1 = We said that a perpetuity is an annuity where n = infinity. What happens to this formula when n gets very, very large? i Result: PV of Perpetuity Simply: PV = PMT x (1/i), or PMT PV = i Example What should you be willing to pay in order to receive $10,000 annually forever, if you require 8% per year on the investment? PV = $10,000/.08 = $125,000 Annuity: Ordinary vs. “Annuity Due” $1000 $1000 $1000 0 1 2 $0 3 This is where we use the “Begin Mode” on your calculator. Example 1 What is the present value of three annual payments of $1,000 starting today if the discount rate is 6%? Set up calculator (remember “Begin” mode) N = 3, PMT = 1000, I/YR = 6 PV = ­2,833.39 $1000 $1000 $1000 0 1 2 $0 3 Example 2 What is the future value of three annual payments of $1,000 starting today if the discount rate is 6%? Set up calculator (remember “Begin” mode) N = 3, PMT = 1000, I/YR = 6 FV = ­3,374.62 $1000 $1000 $1000 0 1 2 $0 3 Multiple Step Problem What would you pay today for the cash flow below if the discount rate is 6%? Can you think of at least five ways to solve this problem? Pick one and do it. 0 1000 1000 1000 4 5 6 1000 7 0 8 Multiple Step Problem—Step 1 What would you pay today for the cash flow below if the discount rate is 6%? What pattern is this? 0 1000 1000 1000 4 5 6 1000 7 0 8 End mode, N=3, PMT=1000, I=6; PV4=2673.01 Multiple Step Problem—Step 2 What would you pay today for the cash flow below if the discount rate is 6%? 0 0 0 0 2673.01 2673.01 0 1 2 3 4 N=4, FV=2673.01, I=6; PV0 = 2117.28 Another Way Multiple Step Problem—Step 1 What would you pay today for the cash flow below if the discount rate is 6%? What pattern is this? 0 1000 1000 1000 4 5 6 1000 7 0 8 Begin mode, N=3, PMT=1000, I=6; PV5=2833.39 Another Way Multiple Step Problem—Step 2 What would you pay today for the cash flow below if the discount rate is 6%? 0 0 0 0 0 2833.39 2833.39 0 1 2 3 4 N=5, FV=2833.39, I=6; PV0 = 2117.28 5 Try This Problem Retirement Example After graduation, you plan to invest $400 per month in the stock market. If you earn 6% per year on your stocks, how much will you have accumulated when you retire after working 30 years? N=360, I=0.5, PMT=400; FV = $402,000 What if you can earn 12% per year? N=360, I=1, PMT=400; FV = $1,398,000 Lesson learned? Team Assignment Upon retirement, your goal is to spend 5 years traveling around the world. To travel in style will require $250,000 per year at the beginning of each year. If you plan to retire in 30 years, what are the equal monthly (end­of­month) payments necessary to achieve this goal? The funds in your retirement account will compound at 10% annually. Approach to the Problem How much do we need to have by the end of year 30 to finance the trip? 250 250 250 250 250 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 Approach to the Problem Using your calculator, Mode = BEGIN PMT = ­$250,000 N = 5 I%YR = 10 P/YR = 1 PV = $1,042,466 Approach to the Problem Now, assuming 10% annual compounding, what monthly payments will be required for you to have $1,042,466 at time 30? Approach to the Problem • Using your calculator, Mode = END P/YR = 1 N = 360 I%YR = 0.8333 FV = $1,042,466 PMT = ­$461.17 So, you would have to place $461.17 in your retirement account, which earns 10% annually, at the end of each of the next 360 months to finance the 5­year world tour. HOW DOES IT APPLY TO YOU? Suppose you are 22 years old. If you plan to retire at 65, how much do you need to save every month to have $2,000,000. Assume you can earn 12%. N=516, I/Yr = 1, FV = 2,000,000, then… Solve for PMT = $118.51 HOW DOES IT APPLY TO YOU? But, suppose you wait until you are 35. How much must you save to reach the same goal? With N = 360, PMT = $572.25 What if you wait until you are 45 or 55? PMT (age 45) = $2,021.72 PMT (age 55) = $8,694.19 MORAL? Start saving early! What is a Bond? Long­term (multi­year) loan to a corporation or governmental entity Considered a legal obligation of the borrower Defined by loan covenants Coupon rate is fixed for the duration of the bond Bonds may trade at any price after they are issued Bond Computation Bonds pay interest (called the “coupon rate”) usually semi­annually Let’s assume 8% coupon paid at end of each year on the par value of a $10,000 bond. Maturity is 10 years At this time, the $10,000 is paid back. If your required rate of return on the bond is 9%, what would you pay for this bond? Bond Computation 0 1 2 -P? 800 800 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 800 800 800 800 800 800 800 800 의의 의의 의의의의의 의의의의 10,000 8% coupon means you receive $10,000 x .08 = $800 at end of each year N = 10 years I = 9 (NOT the 8% coupon rate!) PV of coupon payments = $5,134 (8000 의 의의의의 ) You also receive the $10,000 in 10 years N=10, I=9, FV=10,000 PV of principle paid in 10 years = $4,224 <­ 의의의 1 의의의의 의의 4224 의 의 의) Total PV = $5134 + $4224 = $9,358 Note: many calculators do this in one step, not two, so you can enter N=10, i=9, FV=10,000, PMT=800; PV = $9,358 Job Search Minute: Preparing for an Interview Research the organization/industry thoroughly !!!! Re­read job descriptions. Review a copy of your resume. Develop a list of thoughtful questions. Prepare for open­ended introductory questions! Reconfirm interview details: time, location, etc. Check your appearance carefully. Allow plenty of time to get to the interview. Ending Thought “This institution is unique. It is remarkable. It is a continuing experiment on a great premise that a large and complex university can be first­class academically while nurturing an environment of faith in God and the practice of Christian principles. You are testing whether academic excellence and belief in the Divine can walk hand in hand. And the wonderful thing is that you are succeeding in showing that this is possible —not only that it is possible—but that it is desirable and that the products of this effort show in your lives qualities not otherwise attainable.” President Gordon B. Hinckley ...
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2012 for the course BUS M 301 taught by Professor Jimbrau during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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