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Unformatted text preview: Back to Basics: consumer-centric marketing or target-centric marketing Pedro Ferreira & André Vieira (eds) International Conference on Marketing & Consumer Behaviour – 2013 Back to Basics: consumer-centric marketing or target-centric marketing Porto, 16-17 May 2013 Title: Back to Basics: consumer-centric marketing or target-centric marketing 1st Edition: July, 2013 Editors: Pedro Ferreira, André Vieira Edition and Property: Edições IPAM Av. Boavista, 1102, 1ºDto 4000 - 113 Porto, Portugal Design: André Vieira ISBN: 978-989-98442-4-7 All rights reserved The contents of the papers are the sole responsibility of their respective authors ORGANIZING COMMITTEE MEMBERS Conference Manager Pedro Ferreira Themes Supervisor Irina Saur-Amaral Submissions Coordinator André Vieira Conference Secretariat Supervisor Diana Barradas SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE Name Affiliation Angel Herrero Crespo Carlos Melo Brito Cláudia Simões Daniel Sá Elisa Alen González Elizabeth Real Ferrão Filipe Helena Alves João Leitão Luísa Agante Maria José Silva Maria Teresa Heath Miguel Martin D’Ávila Osmud Rahman Paula Vicente Raquel Reis Vanessa Apaolaza Ibáñez Universidad de Cantabria, Spain Universidade do Porto, Portugal UM, Portugal IPAM – The Marketing School, Portugal Universidade de Vigo, Spain Universidade Lusíada de VNF, Portugal IPAM – The Marketing School, Portugal UBI, Portugal IST, Portugal Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal UBI, Portugal University of Nottingham, UK Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain School of Fashion, Ryerson University, Canada ISCTE, Portugal Universidade Lusíada de VNF, Portugal Universidad del País Vasco, Spain REVIEWERS Name Affiliation Adriana Brambilla Adrienne Steffen Alicia Blanco Angel Herrero Crespo Aruna Mesquita e Noronha Bruno Sousa Carmen Marques Cigdem Sahin Cláudia Carvalho Cláudia Simões Conceição Santos Daniel Sá Danilo de Oliveira Sampaio Elídio Vanzella Elisa Alen González Elizabeth Real Emine Özen OKAT ÖZDEM Helena Alves Ilham Uludag Inês Veiga Pereira Irina Saur-Amaral Isabell Koinig Ivonne Serna João Leitão Jolanta Tkaczyk Jorge Marques Kalender Özcan ATILGAN Luísa Agante Maria Fátima Salgueiro Marek Prymon Margarida Cardoso Maria José Silva Maria Puelles Mark Ng Martín Dávila Nagy Katalin UFPB-Brasil Hochschule für Internationales Management Heidelberg Universidade Rey Juan Carlos Universidad de Cantabria S.S.Dempo College of Commerce and Economics Universidade do Minho / IPCA Universidade de Aveiro Okan University Universidade Portucalense Universidade do Minho ISCTE-IUL IPAM - The Marketing School Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora/UFJF/Brasil ESTÁCIO E ENSINE Universidade de Vigo Universidade Lusíada Ege University Faculty of Communication Universidade da Beira Interior Yalova University ISCAP IPAM - The Marketing School Alpen-Adria University of Klagenfurt Ryerson University Instituto Superior Técnico Akademia Leona Koźmińskiego Faculdade de Economia da Universidade de Coimbra University of Mersin Universidade Nova de Lisboa ISCTE-IUL University of Economics, Wrocław ISCTE-IUL Universidade da Beira Interior Universidade Complutense Hong Kong Shue Yan University IPAM - The Marketing School University of Miskolc, Faculty of Economics Name Affiliation Osmud Rahman Özgür Atilgan Paula Odete Paula Vicente Pedro Ferreira Pedro Mendes Peter Atorough Raquel Meneses Raquel Reis Ricardo Correia Rosa Conde Rui Pascoal Sally McKechnie Sandra Filipe Sara Neves Serap ÇABUK Sérgio Dominique Silvia Faria Susana Marques Susana Romero Teresa Pereira Heath Ugur Bakir Vanessa Apaolaza Ibáñez Verónica Rosendo School of Fashion, Ryerson University Istanbul Kultur University Instituto Politécnico de Bragança ISCTE-IUL IPAM - The Marketing School IPAM - The Marketing School Robert Gordon University Aberdeen Universidade do Porto (Faculdade de Economia) Universidade Lusíada de VNF Instituto Politécnico de Bragança IPAM - The Marketing School Faculdade de Economia da Universidade de Coimbra Nottingham University Business School Universidade de Aveiro Faculdade de Economia da UP University of Cukurova IPCA IPAM - The Marketing School ISAG - Instituto Superior de Administração e Gestão Universidade Rey Juan Carlos Nottingham University Business School Ege Üniversitesi Universidad del País Vasco Colégio de Estudos Financeiros Back to Basics: consumer-centric marketing or target-centric marketing IPAM – The Marketing School Porto 16-17 May 2013 CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Back to Basics: consumer-centric marketing or target-centric marketing Groups of consumers have been the main focus of marketing activity. As an example, the basic idea behind segmentation, one of the most important marketing processes, is that consumers are not all alike. They have different characteristics and lifestyles, which calls for the need to group them (and the market they represent for a respective good) in homogeneous segments so that marketing actions can be better targeted and obtain more effective results. We may call this type of marketing, target-centric marketing. More recently there has been a growing concern with the consumer as an individual. Expressions such as “personalization”, “relationship marketing”, and “co-creation” among others have gained considerable attention from researchers and practitioners. The assumption that “consumers are not alike” takes a step further and consumers are seen as human beings with very specific needs and desires, almost unique or unrepeatable. Each consumer should feel that the marketing action targeted to reach him/her was designed specifically for him/her. This may be called consumer-centric marketing. These two approaches have significant (and different) impacts on marketing practices and marketing management. In target-centric marketing, approaching consumers as a “market” means that companies need to look for characteristics that group consumers and try to know them very well, as a group. In this context, operational marketing tasks are directed to an “anonymous” mass, although a targeted one. In consumer-centric marketing, seeing consumers as unique human beings, whose specific needs and desires need to be fulfilled, demands for a different, more “surgical” approach, even in more operational marketing tasks. Although the latter is gaining supporters, the operational support is much more demanding in terms of processes, human and even financial resources, leaving it difficult for companies to being capable of implementing such a marketing philosophy. This duality was the main focus of our conference as it rises very important questions still unanswered that we invited participants to address. Pedro Ferreira & André Vieira (Editors) Summary SESSION 1 ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 11 M ODELING BRAND EQUITY IN RETAIL BANKING THROUGH COGNITION AND EMOTION...................................................................................12 SOME ASPECTS OF I NTEGRATED M ARKETING COMMUNICATIONS IN BUILDING BRAND EQUITY...................................................................24 PERCEPTION OF SOURCES OF BRAND VALUE TAP PORTUGAL BY THE PERSPECTIVE OF ITS USERS ...............................................................................30 SESSION 2 ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 43 USING THE EYE TRACKING FOR ANALYSIS OF PREFERENCE FOR VEHICLES......................................................................................................44 ANALYSIS OF THE USAGE AND ATTITUDES OF PAYMENT CARDS USERS IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA.........................................................55 COMÉRCIO ELETRÔNICO: PERFIL DO CONSUMIDOR DE BELO HORIZONTE/BRASIL QUE REALIZA COMPRAS ONLINE.....................................68 THE EFFECTS OF REVENUE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES IN CONSUMERS BEHAVIOUR .....................................................................................79 SESSION 3 ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 89 INTENT TO PURCHASE AND CONSUMPTION OF O RGANIC FOOD IN BRAZIL....................................................................................................90 RECENT TRENDS IN CONSUMER BEHAVIOR CONCERNING FOODS WITH HEALTH BENEFITS IN RUSSIA .................................................... 104 THE IMPORTANCE OF COUNTRY OF O RIGIN (COO) ON CONSUMERS PREFERENCE: STUDY ON PACKAGED BUTTER IN THE FOOD M ARKET OF AZERBAIJAN .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 115 SESSION 4 ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 125 D ETERMINANTS FOR PURCHASES OF AGRICULTURAL PESTICIDES: A STUDY ON THE BUYING BEHAVIOR OF RURAL PRODUCER OF COFFEE IN BRAZIL .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 126 M OBILE PHONE SURVEYS TO MEASURE CONSUMER BEHAVIOR: EFFECTS ON DATA QUALITY ...................................................................... 140 COMPETING RESEARCH M ETHODS: WHAT ’S BEHIND IT ? ............................................................................................................................ 147 SESSION 5 ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 157 M ARKETING IN PUBLIC SERVICES: THE CITIZEN SERVICE POINTS IN PORTUGAL....................................................................................... 158 AVALIAÇÃO DA Q UALIDADE DOS SERVIÇOS EM UMA O RGANIZAÇÃO PÚBLICA BRASILEIRA........................................................................ 170 TERRITORIAL MARKETING : A KEY CONCEPT FOR THE PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF CITIES ................................................................ 181 SESSION 6 ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 193 EVALUATING THE USE OF AVATARS AS SOCIABILITY FACTOR IN E-COMMERCE........................................................................................... 194 INFLUENCES OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING ON PRE-ADULT CONSUMERS.................................................................................................... 208 CONSUMERS’ MOTIVATIONS AND ATTITUDE TOWARD THE USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING IN HONG KONG......................................... 220 SESSION 7 ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 232 M ODELING ELECTRONIC AND TOTAL COMMERCE BY INNOVATION DIFFUSION GROWTH MODELS............................................................... 233 INNOVATION, DYNAMIC CAPABILITIES AND PERFORMANCE IN EXPORT MARKETS....................................................................................... 240 AN A NALYSIS OF THE D ECISION STRUCTURE FOR FOOD INNOVATION ON THE BASIS OF CONSUMER AGE................................................. 255 M ARKETING EVALUATION APPROACH IN THE HUNGARIAN MIDDLE-SIZED AND LARGE COMPANIES........................................................... 269 SESSION 8 ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 283 SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CAMPAIGNS AND CONSUMER-CENTRIC M ARKETING, ARE THEY IN COHESION? THE PRACTICES OF TOP TEN O RGANIZATIONS IN TURKEY......................................................................................................................................................................... 284 A MULTI -STAGE STUDY TO MEASURE CUSTOMER PERCEPTIONS OF CSR ..................................................................................................... 296 ROLE OF PRICE OFFER FAIRNESS IN WILLINGNESS TO PAY FOR ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PRODUCTS ................................................ 308 BENEFITS AND MOTIVATIONS FOR COMPANIES TO IMPLEMENT SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE PRACTICES.......................................................... 317 SESSION 9 ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 326 UNDERSTANDING CROSS-BORDER TOURIST REGIONS: A PRELIMINARY APPROACH TO THE CONSUMER PERSPECTIVE ............................... 327 TERRORISM AND INTERNATIONAL TOURISTS .............................................................................................................................................. 334 THE CHOICE OF THE UNIVERSITY ABROAD: A CONCEPTUAL M ODEL.......................................................................................................... 342 8 THE IMPACT OF LOW COST AIRLINES ON TOURISM DEVELOPMENT ............................................................................................................ 352 SESSION 10 .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 361 THE ELDERLY GO THE GYM: A LOOK AT MARKETING .................................................................................................................................... 362 THE "M ADE IN PORTUGAL" CONSUMPTION AND COUNTRY-O F-O RIGIN (C.O.O.) PERCEPTION IN THE CONTEXT OF CRISIS AND AUSTERITY371 CUSTOMER RESPONSE TO M ESSAGE FRAMING IN CAUSE RELATED M ARKETING ....................................................................................... 394 SESSION 11 .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 404 O QUE TEM SE FALADO POR AÍ SOBRE MARKETING INTERNO? UM ESTUDO SOBRE A PRODUÇÃO BRASILEIRA NA ÁREA.............................. 405 CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR, CONSUMPTION AND SYMBOLISM: A THEORETICAL DEVELOPMENT ..................................................................... 419 SOCIAL SUPPORT EXPECTATIONS FROM HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS- ANTECEDENTS AND EMOTIONS........................................................... 430 SESSION 12 .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 439 REVITALIZATION OF OUTSIDE COMMERCIAL AREAS AS STRATEGY TO ATTRACT CONSUMERS AND GET COMPETITIVENESS ........................ 440 THE APPLICATION OF M ARKET BASKET ANALYSIS TO A FASHION RETAILER............................................................................................ 449 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR IN RETAIL: ONLINE AND OFFLINE – WHAT IS THE FUTURE? .................................................................................... 458 SESSION 13 .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 475 THE LEVEL OF TECHNOLOGY ON SOCIAL CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP M ANAGEMENT.................................................................................. 476 HOW O NLINE FASHION VIDEOS AFFECT CONSUMERS’ PERCEPTION OF BRANDS – EYE TRACKING EXPLORATORY STUDY ...................... 490 THE INFLUENCE OF EWOM GENERATED BY THE REFERENCE GROUPS ON FACEBOOK, IN PORTUGAL........................................................ 500 SESSION 14 .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 511 ATRIBUTOS INFLUENCIADORES DA ESCOLHA POR VEÍCULOS: ASPECTOS EXPERIENCIAIS E SIMBÓLICOS ..................................................... 512 THE O THER CUSTOMER’S PRESENCE IN THE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE: A CONCEPTUAL APPROACH .......................................................... 524 EXPERIENCE MARKETING AND HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY: SOCIAL MEDIA AS A TOOL TO ENHANCE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE........................ 535 SESSION 15 .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 543 D RIVERS OF INNOVATION UNDER TURBULENT TIMES IN THE HOTEL INDUSTRY.......................................................................................... 544 INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIAL M ARKETING IN CULTURAL ROUTES O PERATION................................................................................................. 561 HOW TO M EASURE BRAND PERSONALITY OF A NATURE-BASED TOURIST D ESTINATION ......................................................................... 573 SERVICE Q UALITY M EASUREMENT IN THERMAL SPAS’ TOURISM............................................................................................................... 581 SESSION 16 .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 593 A IMPORTÂNCIA RELATIVA DA EMOÇÃO E DA RAZÃO NO PROCESSO DE TOMADA DE DECISÃO DO CONSUMIDOR......................................... 594 HEDONIC CONSUMPTION AND D EPRESSED M OOD: HOW D OES D EPRESSION INFLUENCE CONSUMER BEHAVIOR? .................................. 608 M AIN D RIVERS FOR PURCHASE D ECISION IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL M ARKET FOR M ANDATORY PRESCRIPTION D RUGS ....................... 616 THE INFLUENCE OF ETHNOCENTRICITY IN PURCHASE BEHAVIOR AND ETHNOCENTRIC ATTITUDES ........................................................... 632 SESSION 17 .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 639 RECEPTIVITY TO ADVERTISING IN SOCIAL NETWORKS: AN EMPIRICAL REPLICATION WITH PORTUGUESE USERS....................................... 640 A STUDY OF FASHION M OBILE M ARKETING FROM THE USERS’ PERSPECTIVE ........................................................................................... 651 INTERNET AND CONSUMER EMPOWERMENT : THE ROLE OF DECISION AIDS AND SOCIAL MEDIA ................................................................. 663 SESSION 18 .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 674 STANDARDIZATION VS. LOCALIZATION OF PHARMACEUTICAL ADS: EVIDENCE FROM GERMANY/AUSTRIA AND THE UNITED STATES .... 675 LIMITS TO TRANSPARENCY IN CORPORATE COMMUNICATION: A REFLECTION ON NEED TO EMBRACE SACRED IN SECULAR SPACE OF BSCHOOLS .......................................................................................................................................................................................
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