Membranes, Transport and Cell Signaling F10 for BB

Membranes, Transport and Cell Signaling F10 for BB -...

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1 Membranes and Transport
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2 Membrane Functions Control of exchange of materials (selective uptake and  export of ions and molecules) Organization of cellular funcitons Transformation of energy  Cell communication and signal transduction Cell to cell recognition Adhesion of cells to each other and to the extracellular  matrix
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3 What are the components that make up the plasma membrane? Lipids Primarily  phospholipids  forming bilayer Cholesterol Proteins Multiple functions Carbohydrates Attached to  membrane lipids or  proteins Glycolipids Glycoproteins
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4 Phospholipid Bilayer Phospholipid  construction Bilayer is formed Layers are called leaflets The two leaflets are  generally assymetrical  due to their different  environments Outside hydrophillic;  inside hydrophobic “soap bubble”
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Membrane Fluidity 5
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6 Proteins Found in all  membranes Carry out most cell  functions Peripheral Proteins Integral Proteins Transmembrane  proteins Lipid anchors
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7 Carbohydrates Glycosylation Carbohydrates  added to proteins  and lipids Glycolipids Glycoproteins Glycocalyx protection
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8 The Fluid Mosaic Membrane Model Fluid  phospholipid  layers Collage of  proteins  embedded in  the matrix Fluid Mosaic Membrane Animation
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How Do Substances Cross Membranes? Biological membranes are selectively  permeable Some substances can get through and others can’t Two fundamental processes by which  substances cross biological membranes Passive transport: No direct input of metabolic  energy required Active Transport: requires the input of metabolic  (chemical) energy from an outside source 9
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Membrane Transport Plasma  membrane is  selectively  permeable (also  called semi- permeable)  forming a barrier  between the cell  and its external  environment 10
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Passive Transport Processes Simple Diffusion Diffusion through the phospholipid bilayer Facilitated Diffusion Diffusion through channel proteins or by  means of carrier proteins Passive Transport Animation 11
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12 Simple Diffusion Process of random  movement toward a  state of equilibrium Net movement of  molecules from  areas of high  concentration to  areas of lower  concentration Diffusion does not  require an input of  energy and is a  passive process
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Diffusion Rates Diffusion rate depends on
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Membranes, Transport and Cell Signaling F10 for BB -...

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