Unit 5 Cells and Viruses

Unit 5 Cells and Viruses - Prokaryotic &...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Prokaryotic & Eukaryotic Cells & Viruses Cell Theory A cell is the smallest unit of life All life is made of cells All cells arise from other cells by cell division Cells can be divided into two general groups based upon their structures Prokaryotic cells Bacteria Archaea Eukaryotic cells Animal cells Plant cells Fungal Cells Simplest cells, but great diversity Very small (1-5 m in length) No nucleus DNA found in a nucleoid region not separated from the other cell components No membrane-bound organelles Generally found in one of three shapes Three proteins involved in internal structure FtsZ: cell division MreB: localization of cellular components CreS: cell shape Proteins are related to cytoskeleton proteins Gram positive vs. gram negative cell walls Allow differentiation of bacteria into groups Thick peptidoglycan layer (a) Thick cell wall, no outer envelope (b) Thinner cell wall, with outer envelope Thin peptidoglycan layer Plasma membrane Acidic polysaccharides Plasma membrane Lipopolysaccharide rich outer envelope There are a number of significant differences between the bacteria and archaea, hence the classification into different groups RNA polymerase similar to RNA polymerase II from eukaryotes Translation: methionine vs formyl methionine Ribosomes Cell walls of archaea are chemically and structurally diverse and do not contain peptidoglycan...
View Full Document

Page1 / 40

Unit 5 Cells and Viruses - Prokaryotic &...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online