Lec 15 - 17 (Part 1) - Vision

Lec 15 - 17 (Part 1) - Vision - Vision: The Retina...

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1 Vision: The Retina • Structure of the eye and retina • The photoreceptor cells: phototransduction • Information processing in the retina • Retinal ganglion cells Cross section of the human eye Choroid
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2 Layered structure of the retina Human retina as seen through an ophthalmoscope patient’s right eye webvision.med.utah.edu
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3 Foveal pit: only photoreceptor cells. Other cell layers are displaced laterally to allow light to strike the photoreceptors directly webvision.med.utah.edu Blind spot: light falling on the optic nerve head cannot be detected Demonstration: using your own fingers to detect the blind spot Why are we normally unaware of the blind spot? Perceptual “fill-in” by the visual cortex. Why can’t we see our own blood vessels? Stabilized image fades rapidly with time. Corollary: no blood vessels in the fovea! You actually can sometimes see white blood cells traversing thin retinal vessels. Because they are moving and don’t contain hemoglobin, you can see a white spot moving along the vessel.
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4 Retinal disease: macular degeneration webvision.med.utah.edu Retinal disease: macular degeneration with geographic atrophy
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5 Retinal disease: macular degeneration nei.nih.gov Retinal disease: retinitis pigmentosa webvision.med.utah.edu
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6 Retinal disease: retinitis pigmentosa webvision.med.utah.edu Retinal disease: glaucoma webvision.med.utah.edu
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7 Retinal disease: diabetic retinopathy webvision.med.utah.edu Phototransduction: converting light into an electrical signal • First, something in the photoreceptor must detect the presence of light. That is, there must be a molecule that can absorb photons in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. • Second, absorption of light by the
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2012 for the course BIO 334 taught by Professor Matthews during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lec 15 - 17 (Part 1) - Vision - Vision: The Retina...

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