2-3-11

2-3-11 - Test Case P1 John believes that Jupiter is larger...

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Unformatted text preview: 2-3-11 Test Case P1) John believes that Jupiter is larger than Saturn C) Jupiter is larger than Saturn Argument: Invalid Premises: All true Unsound argument P1) John believes Jupiter is larger than Saturn P2) Everything John believes is true C) Jupiter is larger than Saturn Argument: Valid Premise: Not all true Unsound argument Inclusive and Exclusive Disjunctions Inclusive o At least ine disjunct is true o P or Q, or both o Ex. Either we go to the store, or we go to the mall, or both Exclusive o Only one disjunct is true o P or Q, but not both o Ex. Either we go to the store or we go to the mall, but not both Conditionals o “if-then” statements o Have an antecedent and a consequent o i.e. For “If P then Q” “P” is the antecedent and “Q” is the consequent o True if the antecedent is sufficient for the consequent o True conditionals never have a true antecedent and a false consequent Conditionals and Disjunctions o “If P then Q” means the same as the inclusive disjunction “Either not-P or Q” o “If it is rainy, then it is cloudy” means the same as “Either it is not rainy or it is cloudy” Test Case o Either Woodstock is not a bird, or Woodstock is an animal o If Woodstock is a bird, then Woodstock is an animal o If Woodstock is not an animal, then Woodstock is not a bird Test Case o Either McCloud is a mammal or McCloud is not a dog o If McCloud is not a mammal, then McCloud is not a dog o If McCloud is a dog, then McCloud is a mammal Test Case o Either John is not lecturing or John is lecturing o If John is lecturing, then John is lecturing o If John is not lecturing, then John is not lecturing Other ways of expressing conditionals o “If P then Q” means the same as: o “P only if Q” o “If not-Q, then not-P” o “Q, if P” Conditionals and Arguments o Because conditionals are statements (propositions, assertions, claims, etc.), they are not arguments ...
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2012 for the course PHI 2100 taught by Professor Mikepatterson during the Spring '12 term at FSU.

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2-3-11 - Test Case P1 John believes that Jupiter is larger...

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