Human Identity

Human Identity - -1- Trust, Truth, & Identity The...

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- 1 - Trust, Truth, The Departed Jeff Ackerman November 30, 2006 Ian Williams Writing I
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- 2 - Jeff Ackerman November 25, 2006 Ian Williams Writing I – Essay 2 It is hard to find a film that showcases the remarkable power of human identity that questions trust and deception. Martin Scorsese, a director known for being “the king” of the crime-drama returns with the “edge of your seat” movie of the year, The Departed. It’s one of those few movies so far this year that both critics and moviegoers alike agreed on and for the most part, praised. The reason why the movie is so interesting is because it can be enjoyed and appreciated on so many levels. For instance, I fell in love with the character development and the potency of emotion that the actors utilized and displayed on screen. Others may find the constant suspense and unique plot twists to be the biggest thrill. In any case, the two and a half-hour blockbuster doesn’t even seem like that big of a dose of cinematic euphoria. Set in present day Boston, cinematographer Michael Ballhaus paints a picture of a darker side of the city that would surprise even the most native New Englanders. Based roughly on real-life crime boss James “Whitey” Bulger, Jack Nicholson plays Frank Costello, an Irish mob boss that takes Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon) under his wing as a child with the intentions of breeding him to be a quick talking, alpha-male-type mole for the FBI special investigations unit. During Colin’s Massachusetts State Police training assessment, the camera pans to straight-shooter Billy Costigan (Leonardo DiCaprio), a fairly self-righteous, smart, yet confused young man. In addition to Costello’s breeding tactics, and Sullivan’s natural ability to adapt and human personality mirroring, Sullivan easily clinches the promotion as head of Boston’s Special Investigation’s Unit.
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- 3 - While Sullivan takes advantage of his newfound position leaking police information to his gang, Costigan is accused of pretending to be a cop due to his lousy track record as well as his family history with the law. Costigan’s accusers Captain Queenan (Martin Sheen) and Sergeant Dignam (Mark Wahlberg) have no faith in him ever been a state trooper. However, they see an opportunity to nail Frank Costello by giving Costigan the opportunity to go undercover as a common street thug for the purpose of gathering information on Costello. Queenan files a fake assault charge that Costigan pleads guilty to facing the consequence of enough jail time so that nobody accuses of it being a set-up. Sharing the same characteristics as Sullivan, Costigan has to
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Human Identity - -1- Trust, Truth, & Identity The...

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