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101_12AI_intro - NPB 101 SYSTEMIC PHYSIOLOGY today...

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today… introduce course personnel how to contact us office hours course logistics textbook, readings exams, grading smartsite, lecture slides, podcasts first lecture goal strategy organ systems, cell types explanation of course title NPB 101 - SYSTEMIC PHYSIOLOGY time/place lecture slides podcasts smartsite pre-req personnel office hrs syllabus p.1 textbook readings course pace
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exams grading syllabus p.2 questions & announcements lecture topics syllabus p.3 on smartsite Fig 1-4 to understand the structure & function of organ systems that facilitate survival on land. goal:
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the electrician says... Your body uses neural circuits to: 1) generate & send electrical signals to your brain and spinal cord about stimuli impinging on you (light, sound, touch, temperature, pH, osmolarity, etc) 2) respond appropriately – by producing responses in various tissues (skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, glands, other nerve cells) So let’s learn how: ** nerve cells generate & send signals ** these produce responses in targets the plumber says... Your body also sends chemicals around the body via the blood ‘hormones’ – to control body functions. 1) hormones reach their targets more slowly, and produce responses that are often slower and more long-lasting (than responses to neural inputs) 2) helps control neural development, digestion, metabolism, stress responses, reproduction 3) help determine cell birth, development, death So let’s learn how: ** hormones alter cell &organ function ** hormonal & neural inputs work together (in some cases) consider 2 approaches to understanding organ systems npb101-w2012-ishida Molecular mechanisms, higher functions (perception, memory, emotion), modeling, diseases are topics for other courses Look around you. Notice that terrestrial vertebrates are collections of cells on dry land. www.blueplanetbiomes.org As evolutionary biologists and ecologists, you might ask “why?” For example, if this primate took several days to walk across the landscape shown here, what problems would it face & how will it solve these problems? As physiologists, we will spend this quarter asking “how”? That is, what structures & functions of its body enable it to survive? Loris tardigradus www.smh.com.au/.../2006/06/27/1151174196706 npb101-w2012-ishida
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To begin with, the concentration of water in the air is less than inside us. To estimate this, compare the H 2 O inside an average person vs. the H 2 O in air even on a humid day Since air is so much “drier”, we tend to lose water.
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