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review4 - P.G.T Beauregard Fort Sumter (p. 389-390) The...

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P.G.T Beauregard Fort Sumter (p. 389-390) The Confederate government had been surprised that Pres. Buchanan had refused to withdraw federal troops from Fort Sumter, and had used artillery to prevented Buchanan from reinforcing the garrison. General Pierre G. T. Beauregard was sent by the Confederate government to take command of troops ringing Charleston Bay (where Fort Sumter is located) with cannons pointed at Fort Sumter, to wait and see what President Lincoln and his administration would do after taking office. When Lincoln sent unarmed supply ships, with armed ships waiting outside the harbor in case the Confederates attacked, Beauregard followed Davis' order to fire on Fort Sumter and cause it to surrender. April 12, 1861, when Beauregard opened fire, marked the beginning of the civil war. Battle of Manassas or the Battle of Bull Run (400) Manassas was a key rail junction defended by Beauregard in May 1861. He was reinforced by a second Confederate army led by General Joseph E.
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review4 - P.G.T Beauregard Fort Sumter (p. 389-390) The...

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