Lab Syllabus - Physics
117/197/211
Lab
Information
...

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Unformatted text preview: Physics
117/197/211
Lab
Information
 
 Contact
 Your
Lab
T.A.
 Head
Lab
T.A.
 Faculty
Contact
 Name
 
 Patrick
Johnson
 Dr.
Mairin
Hynes
 E‐mail
 Office
 Phone
 
 
 
 [email protected] 404
Crow
 
 [email protected] 214
Crow
 935‐4495
 
 Dr.
 Hynes
 oversees
 the
 Physics
 117/197/211
 lab
 sections.
 
 If
 a
 problem
 arises
 that
 your
 laboratory
 teaching
assistant
cannot
resolve,
please
contact
her
to
discuss
the
issue.

 
 Overview

 Labs
 are
 every
 two
 weeks,
 depending
 on
 whether
 you
 are
 assigned
 to
 Group
 1
 or
 Group
 2.
 Weekly
 assignments
can
be
viewed
on
the
Lab
Schedule
page.
 
 Before
coming
to
lab,
you
 are
expected
to
have
downloaded
and
 read
that
 week’s
experiment
from
the
 electronic
 lab
 manual,
 as
 well
 as
 completed
 the
 Experimental
 Section
 of
 your
 lab
 report
 in
 your
 lab
 notebook.
 
At
the
start
of
each
lab
section,
your
teaching
 assistant
 will
 give
a
short
lecture
to
introduce
 the
 key
 ideas
 for
 the
 lab.
 For
 the
 remainder
 of
 the
 2.5‐hour
 lab
 session,
 students
 will
 work
 in
 pairs
 to
 collect
data,
analyze
the
experimental
measurements,
and
complete
a
lab
write‐up.

 
 If
 you
 are
 unable
 to
 finish
 your
 lab
 write‐up
 in
 the
 2.5‐hour
 lab
 session,
 you
 may
 take
 your
 notebook
 home
with
you.

 Your
completed
laboratory
write‐up
is
due
at
the
start
of
your
next
lab
session;
even
if
 you
are
unable
to
 attend
your
next
lab
 session,
it
is
 your
 responsibility
to
submit
 your
lab
write‐up
by
 this
 deadline.
 
 Remove
 the
 stamped
 original
 pages
 from
 your
 lab
 notebook,
 staple
 them
 together,
 and
 turn
them
in
to
your
teaching
assistant
before
the
lab
section
begins.

Your
teaching
assistant
will
grade
 your
write‐up
and
return
it
to
you
at
the
next
meeting
of
your
lab
section.

 
 Each
 week
you
should
bring
a
copy
of
that
week’s
experiment,
your
laboratory
notebook,
a
pen
or
pencil,
 and
a
calculator
to
your
lab
section.

The
laboratory
notebook
can
be
purchased
in
the
bookstore.

 
 A
schedule
of
the
labs
for
Fall
2011
is
included
at
the
end
of
this
document,
and
it
is
also
posted
on
the
 Physics
117,
197
and
211
course
web
pages.

There
are
no
labs
scheduled
on
the
days
shaded
entirely
in
 gray.

 
 
 The
lab
sections
for
Physics
117/197/211
meet
in
Crow
311,
314,
and
316.

The
semester
is
broken
up
into
 six
 experiments.
 
 You
 will
 complete
 all
 the
 experiments
 in
 each
 phase
 by
 rotating
 through
 a
 different
 experiment
(and
room)
 every
other
 week.

At
each
lab
session,
your
teaching
assistant
will
inform
you
of
 the
next
experiment
to
be
performed.

The
lab
rotations
will
also
be
posted
on
the
course
websites.

You
 will
remain
with
the
same
teaching
assistant
throughout
the
semester.

 
 Lab
Notebooks

 For
each
experiment,
you
 will
be
asked
to
write
 in
your
laboratory
notebook
to
document
your
 work
 in
 lab.
Even
though
you
will
work
in
pairs
to
acquire
data,
each
individual
is
required
to
maintain
their
own
 lab
notebook
and
turn
in
their
own
lab
write‐up.

Lab
notebooks
must
be
hand
written.

 
 The
lab
notebook
is
a
log
of
your
experiment.

As
you
are
performing
an
experiment,
you
should
record
 detailed
descriptions
of
your
methods
and
your
data
into
your
notebook.

It
should
be
complete
enough
 that
someone
else
could
understand
and
reproduce
your
results
only
by
reading
through
your
 documentation.

Note
that
we
are
asking
you
to
turn
in
a
lab
notebook,
which
is
an
evolving,
non‐polished
 document,
not
a
highly
revised
laboratory
report.
 
 
 Each
lab
write‐up
should
include
the
following:

 
 1.
The
title
of
the
experiment
at
the
top
of
a
new
page
in
your
notebook

 
 2.
 Your
 name,
 your
 partner’s
 name,
 the
 date
 the
 experiment
 was
 performed,
 your
 lab
 section,
 and
 the
 name
of
your
teaching
assistant

 
 3.
The
overall
purpose
or
objective
of
the
entire
experiment
(described
in
your
own
words)

 
 4.
Methods:

 • diagrams
of
the
apparatus
that
illustrate
the
relevant
parameters
for
the
experiment

 • definitions
of
all
the
parameters
to
be
measured
or
used
in
equations

 • a
description
of
the
appropriate
equations
&
concepts
to
be
used
in
the
experiment

 • a
brief
written
summary
of
the
methods
employed
to
acquire
the
data

 
 Note:

The
above
sections
of
your
lab
notebook
must
be
completed
before
your
lab
section
starts.

Failure
 to
do
so
will
result
in
a
score
of
zero
for
the
Methods
Section
of
your
lab
report.
 
 5.
Data:

 • well
organized
data
tables
with
the
appropriate
units
&
uncertainties

 • brief
written
explanations
of
how
you
estimated
uncertainties
in
your
measurements

 • brief
written
observations
about
the
data
or
apparatus
that
may
influence
your
results

 
 6.
Analysis:

 • the
statement
of
key
formulas
used
to
reduce
the
measured
data
to
the
desired
results

 • algebraic
equations
which
solve
for
the
parameters
of
interest

 • showing
your
work
for
at
least
one
iteration
of
each
calculation

 • well‐organized
results
tables
with
the
appropriate
units
on
each
result

 • graphs
with
descriptive
titles,
axis
labels
with
units,
and
legends
(when
more
than
one
data
series
 is
plotted
on
the
same
graph)

 
 7.
Plausibility
Discussion:

 • brief
written
discussion
of
the
plausibility
of
your
results
(Is
the
order
of
magnitude
reasonable?
 Does
the
sign
of
a
numerical
answer
make
sense?
Are
the
units
correct?)

 • comparisons
of
your
results
to
known
values
(when
appropriate)

 • brief
 discussion
 of
 the
 certainty
 to
 which
 you
 believe
 your
 results
 in
 the
 context
 of
 the
 uncertainties
associated
with
the
data

 
 8.
Questions:

 • respond
to
all
questions
and
exercises
throughout
and
at
the
end
of
the
lab

 • summarize
the
question/exercise
within
the
context
of
your
response,
so
a
TA
can
determine
to
 what
you
are
responding

 • write
your
responses
to
questions
and
exercises
in
coherent
sentences.

 
 
 Lab
Grades

 Laboratory
experience
accounts
for
20%
of
the
Physics
117/211
course
grade
and
15%
of
the
Physics
197
 course
grade.
Additionally,
one
or
two
of
the
problems
on
each
exam
may
be
based
on
concepts
learned
 in
the
lab
(regardless
of
whether
they
were
covered
in
lecture).

 
 In
order
to
pass
Physics
117/197/211,
you
have
to
complete
and
receive
a
grade
for
a
minimum
of
5
out
 of
 the
 6
 total
 experiments.

 Not
 completing
 two
 or
 more
 experiments
 will
 result
 in
 failing
 the
 entire
 course,
 regardless
 of
 your
 overall
 course
 percentage.

 Your
 grade
 will
 naturally
 be
 better
 the
 more
 experiments
you
complete.

Uncompleted
labs
will
be
detrimental
to
your
lab
grade
and,
consequently,
to
 your
 overall
 course
 grade.
You
 are
 not
 permitted
 to
 drop
 any
 lab
 grades.
 Each
 experiment
 is
 worth
 a
 total
 of
 40
 points.
 Table
 1
 describes
 the
 criteria
 that
 will
 be
 used
 by
 TAs
 when
 evaluating
 labs.
 The
 information
 expected
 for
 each
 of
 the
 following
 categories
 is
 described
 in
 the
 previous
 section
 of
 this
 document.
 Additionally,
 five
 points
 in
 each
 lab
 will
 be
 allocated
 for
 the
 clarity
 with
 which
 you
 present
 information
in
your
lab
notebook.
You
may
choose
to
structure
your
notebook
in
a
way
that
is
most
useful
 to
you
while
performing
experiments,
but
since
your
TA
will
evaluate
your
lab
notebook,
your
notebook
 must
also
be
easy
to
read
and
follow
for
your
TA.

 
 
 Methods,
Data,
Plausibility,
and
Clarity
(5
Points
for
each
Section)
 
 5
=
All
parts
present
and
fully
developed
 4
=
All
parts
present
but
several
are
incomplete
OR
a
significant
part
is






missing
 3
=
All
parts
present
but
most
are
incomplete
OR
two
significant
parts
are
missing

 2
=
Several
significant
parts
are
missing

 1
=
Little
meaningful
information
recorded
in
notebook
 0
=
Section
is
missing
 
 Analysis
and
Questions
(10
Points
for
Each
Section)

 
 10
=
All
parts
present
and
fully
developed
 8
=
All
parts
present
but
several
are
incomplete
OR
a
significant
part
is
missing

 6
=
All
parts
present
but
most
are
incomplete
OR
multiple
significant
parts
are
missing

 5
=
Some
parts
are
present
and
complete
but
a
number
of
other
parts
are
missing
or
incomplete
 4
=
Several
significant
parts
are
missing

 2
=
Little
meaningful
information
recorded
in
notebook
 0
=
Section
is
missing
 
 Table
1:
Physics
117/197/211
Grading
Criteria
for
Laboratory
Notebooks
 
 Before
 you
 leave
 your
 lab,
 you
 must
 show
 your
 notebook
 to
 your
 TA.
 At
 that
 time,
 they
 will
 stamp
 a
 grading
template
on
your
notebook
and
evaluate
the
Methods
and
Data
portions
of
your
notebook.
After
 you
have
turned
your
notebook
in
to
your
TA,
they
will
assess
the
remaining
categories.

 
 Your
teaching
assistant
is
responsible
for
recording
your
lab
grades.
Your
initialed
and
dated
sheets
from
 your
 laboratory
 notebook
 are
 your
 record
 of
 the
 grades
 you
 received
 in
 lab.
 Retain
 your
 lab
 write‐ups
 until
the
end
of
the
semester.
Periodically
throughout
the
semester,
you
will
receive
grade
reports
for
the
 course.
If
you
discover
any
inaccuracies
in
your
lab
grades,
please
contact
your
teaching
assistant
as
soon
 as
possible.

 
 Late
lab
policy:
 Lab
write‐ups
turned
in
after
your
next
lab
session
begins
are
considered
late.
 
Late
labs
 will
 be
 graded
 as
 usual,
 but
 an
 additional
 6
 points
 (15%
 of
 the
 maximum
 value)
 will
 be
 deducted
 from
 your
grade
for
each
day
that
your
lab
is
late.
After
six
days
past
the
due
date,
a
 maximum
score
of
10/40
 will
be
recorded
for
 labs
turned
in
late
for
grading.

Labs
not
turned
in
at
all
will
receive
a
score
of
zero,
 regardless
of
whether
or
not
the
student
attended
the
lab.
 
 
 
 Make‐Up
Labs

 Make‐up
 labs
 will
 be
 offered
 from
 1:00
 ‐
 3:30
 p.m.
 on
 designated
 Saturday
 afternoons
 (see
 Table
 2
 below
for
the
make‐up
lab
schedule).

It
is
your
responsibility
to
request
a
make‐up
lab
well
in
advance.
 
 Make‐up
 labs
 will
 be
 approved
 only
 for
 legitimate
 absences
 and
 if
 lab
 space
 permits.
 There
 is
 no
 guarantee
that
you
will
be
able
to
make‐up
a
missed
lab.
The
available
seats
will
be
assigned
to
students
 on
a
first‐come‐first‐served
basis.

 Any
make‐up
lab
 requests
 submitted
less
than
24
hours
prior
to
 the
 make‐up
lab
will
be
denied.
 
 If
you
miss
a
lab,
you
are
expected
to
attend
one
of
the
scheduled
make‐up
labs
that
fall
within
two
weeks
 of
your
regularly
scheduled
lab.

Note
that
you
may
need
to
attend
a
make‐up
lab
that
meets
before
you
 are
scheduled
to
perform
the
experiment
in
your
regular
lab
section.

Permission
to
attend
a
make‐up
lab
 that
is
scheduled
more
than
two
weeks
after
the
missed
lab
will
only
be
permitted
under
exceptional
 circumstances.
 
 To
request
a
make‐up
lab:
Direct
a 
web
browser
to 
(http://physics.wustl.edu/ClassInfo/117
 _118/labChangeRequest.php)
and
submit
the
make‐up
lab
request
form.
There
are
also
links
to
this
form
 from
the
Physics
117,
197
and
211
web
pages.
You
may
only
attend
a
make‐up
lab
if
you
receive
an
email
 confirmation
from
the
head
lab
TA,
assigning
you
to
a
particular
make‐up
lab
session.
You
 may
request
a
 make‐up
 lab
 as
 soon
 as
 you
 know
 which
 experiment
 (not
 just
 the
 date)
 you
 will
 be
 missing.
 
 This
 information
is
available
on
the
lab
schedule.
 
 Grading
of
make‐up
labs:

The
TA
running
the
make‐up
lab
session
will
initial
and
date
your
make‐up
lab
 as
 well
 as
 grade
 the
 Methods
 and
 Data
 portions
 of
 your
 notebook
 before
 you
 leave
 the
 makeup
 lab.
 Submit
your
completed
lab
to
the
mailbox
(Compton
244)
of
your
regular
TA
by
5:00
p.m.
on
the
Monday
 following
the
 make‐up
session.
 Be
sure
to
place
the
lab
 write‐up
 in
the
mailbox
 above
your
TA’s
name,
 and
send
your
TA
an
email
to
let
them
know
that
you
left
a
make‐up
lab
in
their
mailbox.

 
 
 Make
–
up
Labs
 
 Experiment
 Make‐Up
Lab
Date
 
 
 Measurements
and
Uncertainties
 9/10
and
9/17
 
 Conservation
of
Momentum
 9/24
and
10/1
 
 Acceleration
Due
to
Gravity
 10/22
and
11/05
 
 Rotational
Motion
 10/22
and
11/05
 
 Simple
Harmonic
Motion
 11/19
and
12/10
 
 Simple
Machines
 11/19
and
12/10
 
 
 Table
2:
Schedule
for
Make‐Up
Laboratory
Exercises
 
 ...
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2012 for the course PSY 197 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '12 term at Washington University in St. Louis.

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