Freud--Presentation--GenLec204 - Life and Death in...

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Unformatted text preview: Life and Death in Psychoanalysis On Freud’s Civilization and its Discontents Peter Bornedal, General Lecture 204 Important Works: Project for a Scientific Psychology Studies on Hysteria (w Josef Breuer) The Interpretations of Dreams Three Theories of Sexuality Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis Totem and Taboo Meta-Psychoanalytical Writings Civilization and its Discontents Scientific & Philosophical Discoveries and Themes: Early Neuroscientific Theory; Therapeutic Technique called Psychoanalysis; Explanation and Interpretation of Dreams; Theory of Childhood Sexuality; Theory of Personality Structure; Arts and Literary Criticism; Cultural and Religious Criticism; Psychoanalytic Anthropology; Theory of Drives. Sigmund Freud: The Rational Philosopher of the Irrational In his early psychoanalysis, Freud divides the human in unconscious and conscious. The unconscious harbors the desires, the consciousness the reason. Freud’s tries to understand the unconscious; and dream analysis becomes “the royal road” to the unconscious. Freud suggests that dreams have meaning , and thus are open to interpretation. This view revolutionized the contemporary notions of what a dream is. Dreams are not simply nonsense or superstition. Neither were they messages from God, but ‘messages’ from the subject itself, implying that they must be understood in relation to the past and present life of the dreamer. They are personal symbolic expressions , and they are typically reactions on something experienced the previous day. In the new view, dreams can be taken seriously and dealt with scientifically. That dreams are individual expressions implies that in the therapeutic situation, the analyst has to consult the dreaming individual about the meaning of the dream. Because there is no standard interpretation of dreams, the psychoanalyst can only interrogate the patient about his or her associations to different dream-elements. What does the patient think about in relation to this or that. Each element of the dream is now used as a starting-point for ‘free association,’ Freud’s famous ‘Couch’. The psychoanalyst is sitting in a chair behind the patient, avoiding eye-contact, and listening to the patient's free associations. The patient is under therapeutic obligation to tell everything that comes to her mind. She is asked to reveal her ‘associations’ to different elements in for example a dream. The Dream: The Technique of ‘Free Association’ Salvador Dali: A sleeping woman – in all her naked vulnerability – is attacked by ferocious tigers and spiked weapons. Remember that the dream is always ‘wishfulfilment’; meaning that the dream fulfills a wish, but in disguise, and sometimes turned into its opposite. The wish is sex, but since forbidden, disguised as aggression....
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2012 for the course BUSINESS CS204, Eco taught by Professor Mr during the Spring '12 term at American University of Beirut.

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Freud--Presentation--GenLec204 - Life and Death in...

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