EEET2369_Lab3 - School of Electrical & Computer...

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School of Electrical & Computer Engineering January 2012 EEET2369 EEET2369 EEET2369 Signals and Systems (Lab 3) Signals and Systems (Lab 3) Signals and Systems (Lab 3) 1 Laboratory Exercise 3 Laboratory Exercise 3
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School of Electrical & Computer Engineering January 2012 EEET2369 EEET2369 EEET2369 Signals and Systems (Lab 3) Signals and Systems (Lab 3) Signals and Systems (Lab 3) 2 Laboratory Exercise 3: Sampling and Reconstruction Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this laboratory exercise you will be able to: Represent information as time-domain or frequency- domain functions as the problem (sampling and reconstruction) requires, and explain the equivalence between these domains. Represent the operation of a sampling system in the time- or frequency-domain as the problem requires. Discuss the basic theory and operation of analogue to digital conversion systems. Introduction to the exercise Since the 1970s computers and other digital devices have become more and more popular in the area of signal processing, these devices provide a flexible and easy way to manipulate many types of signals. The only problem with this is that computers and DSPs are not able to process and/or store analogue signals (continuous in both time and amplitude), which are the most common signals generated in the natural world (i.e. speech, temperature fluctuations, EEG, ECG, etc). Therefore some technique needs to be used to convert signals from analogue to digital. This process of converting analogue signals to digital is called sampling in the time-domain and quantisation in the amplitude domain. Sampling in the time domain alone can be used in analogue communication systems for time-division multiplexing (TDM), but to be able to process and store signals on digital devices both sampling and quantisation need to be combined. As sampling ignores values of a signal between the sampling instants, there is a chance of losing information. It has been shown that perfect reconstruction is possible as long as the sampling frequency s s T f / 1 = is more than twice the signal’s
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School of Electrical & Computer Engineering January 2012 EEET2369 EEET2369 EEET2369 Signals and Systems (Lab 3) Signals and Systems (Lab 3) Signals and Systems (Lab 3) 3 bandwidth, B , i.e., B f s > 2 / or B f s 2 > . This rule is known as Nyquist’s criterion . Background Skills and Knowledge Before you attempt this exercise you should have attended the lectures relating to the sampling of signals. Part 1: Sampling and Reconstruction (Theory) Tasks 1 - 3 will look at how to implement a simple sampling and reconstruction simulation in MATLAB. Laboratory exercise 3
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EEET2369_Lab3 - School of Electrical & Computer...

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