Lab_2_ComparativeAnat_MAP2012

Lab_2_ComparativeAnat_MAP2012 - Lab 2 Comparative Anatomy...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
12 Lab 2 Comparative Anatomy: Humans as Peculiar Primates - Objectives - The emphasis in this lab will be on: (a) the ways in which humans share characteristics with other primates, and (b) the ways in which humans differ from other primates. We will look at skeletal specimens of mammals to see where humans fit in the order Primates. The following exercises will encourage you to think deductively about how we use comparative anatomy to classify organisms and how these classifications illustrate the terms of evolutionary history. Station 1 At this station, you will compare four different skeletons: a dog (representing non - primate mammals), a macaque and a chimpanzee (both non-human primates), and a human. Please note that some of these features (snout length, brain size) are relative: e.g., you should think about snout length as shortest to longest rather than short or long. Table 1. Dog Macaque Chimpanzee Human What is the number of digits (fingers)? Is there a clavicle (collar bone)? Is the pollex (thumb) opposable? Relative snout length? Is the brain size big or small for body size? * Is the position of the eyes forward or side- facing? (e.g., consider the distance between the eyes)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
13 * The concept of brain size relative to body size is complex, and the trait is hard to determine visually. When evaluating this feature, pretend you are comparing two animals of similar body size and then predict which would have the larger brain size. Question 1: Based on your chart, what features do primates share with non-primates (such as the dog)? We term such traits ancestral because they are inherited from a common ancestor. Question 2 : Based on your chart, what features are unique to primates (macaque, chimpanzee, and human)? These traits are called derived traits. Station 2 At this station you will compare the orbit (eye) and teeth of a lemur (a strepsirhine), a macaque (a haplorhine), and a human . Use the specimens to complete the chart below. Figure 1 Figure 2 Fig. 1. Use this figure to guide your observations of the orbital region. Note the lack of any postorbital closure on the raccoon, the presence of a postorbital bar on the lemur, and the presence of a combined postorbital bar
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 17

Lab_2_ComparativeAnat_MAP2012 - Lab 2 Comparative Anatomy...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online