SDENG3J- Assignment 02.pdf - Simone Lea Pappiah SDENG3J...

This preview shows page 1 - 5 out of 8 pages.

Simone Lea Pappiah SDENG3J Assignment 02 Student Number: 50437933 Due: 30 June 2020
Option B: Prose and Drama Question 1 Grade: 12 Duration: Double period lesson of 45 minutes each Lesson Outcomes: - To be able to engage with the text in a group context - For the learners to be able to understand the characterisation of the protagonist - To be able to identify the themes, styles and tones of the literary text - To familiarize the learners with the historical significance of Romeo and Juliet - To be able to identify the protagonist/s and other significant characters - To be able to identify the setting of the literary text Resources: Romeo and Juliet book, chalkboard or whiteboard, chalk or marker, books for learners to take notes in, writing material Introduction to lesson “Comparing and contrasting is an important skill that helps reinforce key attributes of the play’s characters, and helps create connections with the plot and theme. The characteristics that make up the protagonist and antagonist help shape the outcome of the narrative. Shakespearean plays are known for their “Foil Characters” whose main values differ from that of the protagonist.” In the introduction to the lesson, I gave a brief account of William Shakespeare and the times he lived in and also gave a summarization of the book and what was done in the final scene that was read in the last lesson as we have finished reading the book by the last lesson. For Activity 1, I split the class in to groups of 5 and 6 pupils, being sure to put a mix of linguistically strong and weak pupils together to maintain the discussion and assist each other. Each group had to discuss the characters in the story and who they thought the protagonist/s in the story were and why they thought this was the case. Students were encouraged to focus on the protagonists but to also discuss other characters in light of the protagonist and their relationship. This activity was to assist learners in identifying the character traits of a protagonist and also to identify why a character is deemed a protagonist. The students were given 15 minutes to discuss this. I could hear some students arguing with each other as to whether Romeo or Juliet was the protagonist. I did not intervene, as I wanted the opinions to be of their own and also to encourage more discussion
around the story. Each student was asked to give their views in the group so that each could have an input. Some students were quiet in their groups so as I walked around, I asked questions to those pupils specifically to encourage them to talk within their group. For example, I asked one pupil her opinion on who she feels the antagonist is in the story and why she felt this way. She opened up about how she felts the parents were the antagonists and how it affected their relationship with Rome and Juliet negatively.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture