Chapter 7 - Chapter 7: Love & Intimacy Chapter 7...

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Chapter 7: Love & Intimacy
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Chapter 7 Outline What is Love? Love in Other Times and Places The Forms and Measure of Love Romantic vs. Companionate Love The Colors of Love: John Alan Lee Love Triangles: Robert Sternberg Can We Measure Love?
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Chapter 7 Outline (Cont.) Theories: Where Does Love Come From? Behavioral Reinforcement Theories Cognitive Theories Physiological Arousal Theories Evolutionary Theories Biological Theories
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Chapter 7 Outline (Cont.) Love from Childhood to Maturity Childhood Adolescence Adult Love and Intimacy Attraction Attraction in Different Cultures Intimate Relationships Long-Term Love and Commitment Loss of Love
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Chapter 7 Outline (Cont.) Love, Sex, and How We Build Intimate Relationships Love and Sex Developing Intimacy Skills The Dark Side of Love
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What is Love? Most of western history is filled with marriage for economic reasons 19 th century brought the idea that romantic love was the most wanted form of a love relationship Unrequited love – loving those one can not have
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The Forms and Origin of Love Romantic love – passionate love that includes sexual desire, physical attraction, and elation We tend to idealize our romantic partner Companionate love (conjugal love) – deep affection, attachment, intimacy, trust, loyalty Colors of Love (Lee) Love Triangles (Sternberg) Can We Measure Love?
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Colors of Love (Lee, 1974, 1998) Based on research Six basic ways (“colors”) to love Love styles are independent Lovers with compatible love styles will be happier with each other than incompatible styles
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Colors of Love (Lee, 1974, 1998) (Cont.) Manic and ludic – poorer psychological health Storge and eros – higher psychological health Men – more socially acceptable to have eros or ludus styles; less to have agape; more likely to have ludic style Women – more socially acceptable to have agape; less to have ludus; more likely to have pragmatic style
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Love Triangles (Sternberg, 1998, 1999) Love is three elements that can be combined to produce 7 different types of love Three basic elements: Passion – sexual desire and physical attraction; part of romantic love Intimacy – connection and feelings of closeness; an emotional investment Commitment – to love in the short term; to maintain that love in the long term
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2012 for the course ACCT 201 and 20 taught by Professor Any during the Spring '12 term at Old Dominion.

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Chapter 7 - Chapter 7: Love & Intimacy Chapter 7...

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